‘The Brothers Karamazov’ by Fedor Dostoevsky.

Updated 18 January 2013
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‘The Brothers Karamazov’ by Fedor Dostoevsky.

Thinking about literary masterpieces, one of the first titles that comes to mind is “The Brothers Karamazov,” by Russian writer Fedor Dostoevsky.
Fëdor Michailovic Dostoevsky (1821-1881) was born in Moscow — the second of seven siblings. His father was a doctor and wanted Fedor to undertake a career in the army. But his interests were purely literary, and this brought him to live in poverty almost all his life. He was taken to prison for political reasons and got near to being executed. He was condemned to four years of forced labor in Siberia instead. After being released, he continued struggling with his literary work and with poor health. A happy second marriage helped him to straighten up his life. He died at the age of 59 and was buried in St. Petersburg.
His most famous novels are “Crime and Punishment,” “The Idiot” and, of course, “The Brothers Karamazov,” his last and largest literary work. Dostoyevsky spent nearly two years writing it and it is considered his masterpiece. The work was first published as a serial in “The Russian Messenger” and was completed in November 1880.
The story revolves around a family of four brothers and their difficult relationship with their vulgar, depraved father. Dmitri is the passionate one, Ivan is the intellectual one, Aljosha is the mistic and Smerdjakov (an illegitimate son who lives in the household as a servant) is a misanthropist and an admirer of Ivan’s drastic philosophical ideas. Many are the conflicts depicted in the story that put the characters against each other. Fights over money and love, intrigue, suspicion, betrayal, theft, create an atmosphere of overall gloom and unhappiness.
The drama explodes when Smerdjakov kills their father. All the brothers appear to feel guilty, as if they were all responsible for such death. Suspects fall upon Dmitri, who had ample reasons to wish his father dead and who is also found in possession of money that does not belong to him. At the end Smerdjakov confesses his crime to Ivan, and then hangs himself. During the trial, described at length and in detail, Ivan tells the truth about the events, but he is not believed and Dimitri is condemned to forced labor.
In this novel Dostoevsky treated all the themes that had agitated his spirit throughout his entire life: faith, doubt, love as well as hate for authority, sensuality and mysticism, trust and mistrust toward humankind.
Thinking about “The Brother Karamazov,” a comparison comes to my mind. In the vastness of its conception, in fact, I see it similar to Michelangelo’s frescoes in the Vatican’s “Sistine Chapel,” as they both offer a huge, spectacularly vivid representation of most of the flaws of the human condition. When you see the behavior of some characters in the novel, you are immediately brought to dislike them from the deep of your heart. You are confronted with selfishness, carelessness, sneakiness, exasperation, contempt, lies, aggression, victimization, jealousy ... In this story you witness the extremes of human nature. Reflecting upon them might be a great guide, for each of us, toward a profound and fruitful self-examination, because each of us might “recognize” him/herself in the thoughts, feelings, even behavior of one character or another. Nothing to be scared of, though. We are humans and humans have flaws. To different degrees, of course, but still …

Elsa Franco Al Ghaslan


All eyes on Salah as Egyptians await Champions League final

Updated 27 May 2018
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All eyes on Salah as Egyptians await Champions League final

CAIRO: An owner of a Cairo coffee shop supervised last-minute arrangements for Saturday’s European Champions League final between Real Madrid and Liverpool, giving instructions to his employees as they lined up chairs and set up a bigger television set.
“Today is the big day for us. No match is more important than tonight’s, simply because Mohamed Salah is playing,” Mohamed Fathy, the owner of a cafe located in the affluent district of Maadi in southern Cairo, told Arab News.
Salah has enjoyed a record-breaking debut season with Liverpool and could cap a remarkable campaign by leading the Reds to the most-coveted European title as they face serial winners Real Madrid, who are eyeing a third successive triumph.
Nicknamed the Egyptian King, Salah has racked up a record 32 Premier League goals in a 38-game campaign and netted 10 Champions League goals to help Liverpool reach their first final since losing 2-1 to AC Milan in 2007.
He has become a national hero in Egypt, with his popularity hitting unprecedented heights. Saturday’s Champions League final is given more attention than any fixture for Cairo giants Ahly or Zamalek, who each have a huge fan base in the football-mad country.
“We raised our prices a bit because this is the probably the most important day of the football season. We expect to welcome the same number of people who came to the cafe when Egypt defeated Congo (last October) to reach the World Cup,” Fathy said.
Salah ‘gatherings’
Friends have been making plans for weeks to watch the game, choosing between a plenty of options as Cairo’s cafes and mega-malls gear up for the final.
Cairo Festival City, a mall in the upscale Fifth Settlement district, installed a huge screen for its visitors, creating a stadium-like atmosphere. Vodafone, Egypt’s leading mobile operator, launched a competition and invited customers to watch the match and have the pre-dawn Suhoormeal at Cairo’s upmarket Ritz-Carlton hotel.
Coffee shops in poorer areas also replaced their television sets with larger models, which were placed in the streets in order to accommodate as much people as possible.
Many friends are planning to come together in large gatherings at homes after the Ramadan iftar meal to watch Salah in action, but some have mixed emotions.
Spanish giants Real Madrid, the world’s most successful outfit, are popular in Egypt and favored by millions of Egyptians, who will be equally keen to see Salah lift the Champions League trophy in Kiev.
“I really don’t know who I should support now; my heart is split between Real Madrid, the club I have been supporting since I was child, and Salah who deserves to finish his season by winning such a prestigious title,” said Mahmoud Raheem, a 32-year-old fan.
But Liverpool and Salah still enjoy the unique support of their own fans. The club, England’s most successful in Europe, has an official fan club in Egypt, which includes thousands of supporters.
They plan to watch the game on a huge screen in Cairo’s Nasr City district, hoping Salah could play an instrumental role in giving them a title they have long sought.
“It will be difficult against Real because of their experience, but we still have deadly counter-attacking abilities that could help us a lot. Salah has had a great season and it would be great if he can finish the season by leading us to the trophy,” said Ahmed Maher, a 36-year-old Liverpool fan.
If Salah wins the Champions League, he will only become the second Arab to taste that glory after Algerian great Rabah Madjer, who was on target in Porto’s famous 2-1 comeback win over Bayern Munich in the 1987 European Cup final.