‘A prayer a day’ for Slovak politicians

Updated 04 January 2013
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‘A prayer a day’ for Slovak politicians

BRATISLAVA: Disillusioned Slovaks are turning to the power of prayer in the hope of cleaning up politicians widely regarded as corrupt. More than 400 people have vowed to pray for the politician of their choice for at least five minutes a day for six months since the Internet initiative was launched on Tuesday. “Some people choose their favorite politician, while others might pray for their least favorite lawmaker in order to change their behavior,” a woman said. She declined to name the politicians who have mustered the most prayers so far.
Slovak politics were rocked to the core last year when a secret-service file code-named Gorilla leaked on the Internet revealed alleged links between oligarchs from a private financial group and nearly all of the country’s political elite.
The leak has inspired the rise of the Internet-fueled “anti-Gorilla” movement, attracting thousands to rallies in Slovakia’s capital Bratislava. But more than a year after the scandal erupted, police are still investigating and have yet to press charges.


Welsh street named steepest in world; New Zealand loses out

Gwyn Headley and Sarah Badham hold a certificate for the record title for world's steepest street, in Harlech, Wales, Britain July 10, 2019, in this handout photo released on July 16, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 28 min 41 sec ago
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Welsh street named steepest in world; New Zealand loses out

  • The Welsh campaign was led by businessman and architectural historian Gwyn Headley. He says he feels “jubilation” now that the street has been recognized

LONDON: A street in Wales has been designated the steepest in the world after a successful campaign by residents.
The title comes at the expense of a street in New Zealand, which has apparently been eclipsed in the steepness sweepstakes.
Guinness World Records said Tuesday that the street of Ffordd Pen Llech in the seafront town of Harlech, 245 miles (395 kilometers) northwest of London, has a gradient of 37.45%, two percentage points steeper than the former title holder in Dunedin on New Zealand’s South Island.
The Welsh campaign was led by businessman and architectural historian Gwyn Headley. He says he feels “jubilation” now that the street has been recognized.
He says he feels sorry for New Zealand, but that “steeper is steeper.”