10 die in Yemeni military plane crash

Updated 22 November 2012
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10 die in Yemeni military plane crash

SANAA, Yemen: A Yemeni military plane crashed early yesterday during training over the capital, Sanaa, killing all 10 people on board, security officials said.
The Russian-made Antonov aircraft plunged from the sky and crashed into an empty market in Al-Hassaba district at the heart of the Yemeni capital, destroying several shops, the officials said. The market has been abandoned since clashes between the country’s biggest tribal confederation and security forces in the area during last year’s uprising.
The officials said the pilot tried to make an emergency landing after one of the plane’s engines failed, but instead, the plane crashed and caught fire. The victims included the pilots and crew members, the officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media. Ambulances and fire engines rushed to the crash site.
There was no indication of sabotage in the crash, the officials said.
The Arab world most impoverished nation, Yemen has been challenged by a rising Al-Qaeda in the aftermath of the uprising that led to the ouster of the country’s longtime authoritarian ruler, Ali Abdullah Saleh. The United States considers Yemen’s offshoot of Al-Qaeda as the world’s most dangerous branch of the terror network.
Yemen’s military has been engaged in a wide offensive against Al-Qaeda since last spring, and has managed to uproot the militants from strongholds in the south they seized during the uprising.


Letter to Qatar: Abandon PR, change attitude, and siege would be lifted

Updated 26 April 2018
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Letter to Qatar: Abandon PR, change attitude, and siege would be lifted

LONDON: Four Arab ambassadors have called on Qatar to improve relations with its neighbors, change its attitude and stop its support for extremism, terror and destabilization in the region.

The four ambassadors of Saudi Arabia (Mohammed bin Nawwa), Bahrain (Fawaz bin Mohammed Al-Khalifa), the UAE (Suleiman Al-Mazroui) and Egypt (Nasser Kamel) co-wrote a letter published on Wednesday in the Financial Times to answer an FT lead article titled “Qatar siege is meaningless.”

The ambassadors stressed in the letter that their governments had no plans to incorporate Qatar, as the FT claimed, but all they hoped for is that the Doha government committed to the international criteria to fight terrorism and “stop its support for terror and extremism in the region.”

In the letter, the four ambassadors reminded the paper that the prime minister of Qatar attended the wedding of the son of Abdel Rahman Al-Nueimi,who is listed on a US terror list, and is the main conduit to Al-Qaeda in Iraq where, according to the US, he funnelled millions of US dollars to the organization there.

The ambassadors added that Al-Nueimi is one of many sponsors of terror living and working in Qatar.

The ambassadors drew the readers’ attention to Qatar’s “double standard behavior” — saying one thing to the West, and doing the opposite.

They concluded the letter by demonstrating Qatar’s “duplicity.”

They said that Qatar has recently intensified the use of its media and PR to promote and support terror in the Middle East generally and in Saudi Arabia especially.

Recently Qatari broadcasters opened their airwaves to Houthi militia in Yemen and its propaganda calling for attacking Saudi Arabia.

In conclusion the ambassadors called on Doha to quit its public relations campaign and change its attitude — only then would the siege be over.