19 children among 46 dead in China landslide

Updated 12 January 2013
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19 children among 46 dead in China landslide

BEIJING: A desperate search for three people missing in a landslide in southwestern China ended on Saturday when their bodies were pulled from the mud, taking the final death toll to 46 — many of them children.
Authorities in Yunnan province said that the last three bodies were recovered on Saturday morning after a night of frantic efforts by more than 1,000 rescue workers to locate the final missing residents of the remote village of Gaopo.
Xinhua said those buried included 27 adults and 19 children.
Two other people were hospitalized after the landslide struck on Friday morning, engulfing 16 homes, bringing a thunderous crash and throwing up thick clouds of dust, the official Xinhua news agency said.
Rescuers toiled into the night, braving bitter wind and freezing temperatures, using lamps and specialized detection devices in the hope of locating the missing, Xinhua said.
Soldiers, police, firefighters and mine rescue workers joined the search operation, using 20 excavators and trucks, it added.
Li Yongju, 50, said she heard the crash of the landslide while cleaning her yard and rushed with other villagers to the disaster site with shovels and hoes.
“We pulled out several people, one of whom was breathing weakly. But after a while, he died,” Xinhua quoted Li as saying.
Zhou Benju, wept as she recounted hearing the rumble of the landslide.
“Several relatives of my parents — my grandma, brother, uncle and my aunt’s family members, died,” she told the agency.
Hundreds of thousands of messages of support had been posted on microblogging site Sina Weibo.
“Pray for those who remain missing in the debris. Life is too fragile. We only wish miracles can happen!” read one post.
“It is a tragedy, a real tragedy!” wrote another on Sohu.com.
Photos on Yunnan Web, run by the Yunnan provincial government, showed rescuers in orange uniforms digging into wide swathes of mud against a backdrop of snow-covered, terraced hills.
A video posted on a Chinese social networking site appeared to show a group of villagers digging through thick mud and debris to uncover a body, which was carried away on a stretcher.
Xinhua said that the landslide had been triggered by 10 days of non-stop rain and snow, according to initial geologists’ reports.
The area has experienced unusually low temperatures in recent weeks during what authorities have called China’s coldest winter in 28 years.
The landslide spread over an area 120 meters (yards) long, 110 meters wide and 16 meters deep, according to authorities.
The Communist Party’s top leaders Xi Jinping and Li Keqiang, along with Premier Wen Jiabao, ordered “all-out efforts to rescue victims,” Xinhua said.
Yunnan province, which borders Myanmar, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam, is a relatively poor part of China where rural houses are often cheaply constructed.
Gaopo is in Zhenxiong county, in the northeast of Yunnan, a temperate province known for its tobacco industry and for being the home of Pu’er tea.
But its mountainous areas are prone to landslides and earthquakes. Two quakes in September — one of magnitude 5.7 — left 81 dead and hundreds injured.
A neighboring county was hit by a landslide in October that killed 18 children, after one that killed 216 people in 1991, according to the United States Geological Survey.
An earthquake in neighboring Sichuan province in 2008 claimed around 70,000 lives — the worst natural disaster to hit China in three decades, with shoddy buildings blamed for the high toll.


Rohingya refugees rescued after drifting at sea for 9 days

Updated 21 April 2018
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Rohingya refugees rescued after drifting at sea for 9 days

BIREUEN, Indonesia: A Rohingya Muslim man among the group of 76 rescued in Indonesian waters in a wooden boat says they were at sea for nine days after leaving Myanmar, where the minority group faces intense persecution, and were hoping to reach Malaysia.
The eight children, 25 women and 43 men were brought ashore on Friday afternoon at Bireuen in Aceh province on the island of Sumatra, the third known attempt by members of the ethnic minority to escape Myanmar by sea this month. Several required medical attention for dehydration and exhaustion, local authorities said.
Fariq Muhammad said he paid the equivalent of about $150 for a place on the boat that left from Myanmar’s Rakhine state, where a violent military crackdown on the minority group has sparked an exodus of some 700,000 refugees over land into neighboring Bangladesh since August.
The refugee vessel was intercepted by a Thai navy frigate and later escorted by a Thai patrol vessel until sighting land, said Fariq. The group believed the Thais understood they wanted to reach Malaysia and were dismayed when they realized they were in Indonesia, said Fariq, who gave the identification numbers of the Thai vessels.
“We were forced to leave because we could not stay, could not work so our lives became difficult in Myanmar. Our identity card was not given so we were forced to go,” he told The Associated Press on Saturday.
Local officials and a charitable group are providing shelter and food for the refugees. The International Organization for Migration said it has sent a team from its Medan office in Sumatra, including Rohingya interpreters, to help local officials with humanitarian assistance.
Rohingya, treated as undesirables in predominantly Buddhist Myanmar and denied citizenship, used to flee by sea by the thousands each year until security in Myanmar was tightened after a surge of refugees in 2015 caused regional alarm.
In April, there has been an apparent increase in Rohingya attempts to leave the country by sea. An Indonesian fishing boat rescued a group of five Rohingya in weak condition off westernmost Aceh province on April 6, after a 20-day voyage in which five other people died.
Just days before, Malaysian authorities intercepted a vessel carrying 56 people believed to be Rohingya refugees and brought the vessel and its passengers to shore.
Mohammad Saleem, part of the group that landed Friday in Aceh, said they left from Sittwe in Rakhine state, the location of displacement camps for Rohingya set up following attacks in 2012 by Buddhist mobs.
“We’re not allowed to do anything. We don’t have a livelihood,” the 25-year-old said. “We can only live in the camps with not enough food to eat there. We have no rights there.”