2012 deadliest year on record for journalists

Updated 20 December 2012
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2012 deadliest year on record for journalists

More journalists were killed doing their job in 2012 than in any year since monitoring started 17 years ago, with Syria and Somalia seeing a particularly heavy toll, Reporters Without Borders said yesterday.
Eighty-eight journalists were killed, a third more than last year, as security forces in various conflict zones cracked down on a new crop of citizen journalists attempting to document their activities, the Paris-based rights group said.
“The high number of journalists killed in 2012 is mainly due to the conflict in Syria, the chaos in Somalia and to violence by the Taleban in Pakistan,” Christophe Deloire, the head of RSF, said.
Those responsible for mistreating or killing journalists, photographers and cameramen usually face no punishment, creating a sense of impunity which encourages further violence, he added.
Meanwhile, Turkey has more jailed reporters than China, Eritrea, Iran or Syria, making it “the world’s biggest prison for journalists,” RSF said.
The report adds to a growing chorus of criticism from Western governments and rights groups of the EU candidate’s jailing of journalists, most of whom are kept in pretrial detention.
Repressive laws, broad and vague legal provisions and a paranoid judiciary were to blame for the high number of arrests, RSF said, and only a complete overhaul of Turkey’s anti-terrorism law and other legal articles could change this.


Nawaz Sharif flying back to Pakistan with his daughter

Updated 22 April 2018
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Nawaz Sharif flying back to Pakistan with his daughter

  • The former premier and his family are facing corruption charges in the wake of the apex court’s verdict against them in the Panama case
  • PM Abbasi says the Sharifs will not choose self-imposed exile

ISLAMABAD: Former prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, and his daughter, Maryam, will reach Pakistan tonight after spending a few days in London.
The two most prominent leaders of the ruling Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) party had flown to the United Kingdom on Wednesday to visit the ex-premier’s ailing wife, Kalsoom Nawaz, who is undergoing cancer treatment in that country.
Some of their political rivals had criticized their departure from Pakistan, claiming that they were facing serious financial allegations and their prolonged absence from the country could jeopardize the accountability process against them.
Maryam Nawaz, however, assuaged these fears when she tweeted on Sunday: “At the Heathrow, leaving for Islamabad shortly.” She added that she “will arrive [in Pakistan] in the wee hours to be at the court.”

On Saturday, Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi also rejected the possibility that Sharif and his daughter would take advantage of their visit to the UK and turn it into a self-imposed exile.
Sharif had also issued a similar statement, saying: “I will not act like Pervez Musharraf and will return to the country soon.”
While the primary purpose of his visit to London was to meet his wife and interact with her doctors, the former premier also met Abbasi, who was invited to a Commonwealth conference, and discussed with him the issue of choosing the interim prime minister.
Once the Sharifs return to Pakistan, they will face court cases again and continue their party’s struggle to win the next general elections.