80% of judges under online inspection system

Updated 06 February 2013
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80% of judges under online inspection system

The Justice Ministry’s new remote inspection system has brought 80 percent of the judges in the Shariah courts under online monitoring.
“The remote inspection system has been implemented in 100 courts in which 700 judges, who account for 80 percent of the total number of judges in the Kingdom, are working,” an informed source at the Ministry of Justice said. It added that the remaining 20 percent of the judges are subject to field inspections.
The online system can also discover a court’s need for more juries and distribute judges evenly in all courts, besides evaluating the performance of courts and judges.
Other advantages of the system include the speedy disposal of cases and reducing the delay in holding hearings. The system can also monitor case registrations and appointments for hearings, in addition to monitoring judicial activities.
The online system enables inspectors to monitor proceedings in a court from any place and even after working hours. The online linking system currently in place in courts enables judges to communicate with one another and alerts them to incoming cases in advance. This also includes access to case files outside the courts and office hours.
Another feature of the online system is that the disputing parties in a case will have access to the details of their case, which can assist them in preparing for upcoming hearings.
The Supreme Judiciary Council decided to introduce the remote inspection system last year, with the aim of bringing about a qualitative shift in the country’s legal system with more efficiency and speed.
According to the statutes governing the judiciary system, 30 cases handled by a judge should be inspected and evaluated at least once, or twice if possible, in a year. A judge who receives less than average grading in his evaluation will be subject to monitoring in all the cases he handles, according to the statues. The inspection also covers judges in appeal courts and deals with complaints by or against judges.
Another informed source put the number of marriage clerks in the Kingdom at 5,171. The Ministry of Justice issues licenses allowing marriage clerks to become eligible to register marriages only if they are Saudi and hold a university degree, with a specialization in Shariah.


Saudi businesswomen eye greater role in the economy with end to driving ban

The end of the driving ban is expected to help bring an economic windfall for Saudi women. (Shutterstock)
Updated 23 June 2018
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Saudi businesswomen eye greater role in the economy with end to driving ban

  • The historic move is a huge step forward for businesswomen in the Saudi Arabia, says businesswoman
  • A recent survey by the Jeddah Chamber of Commerce indicated that transportation was a major concern holding Saudi women back from joining the labor market

The end of the driving ban will boost women’s financial power and allow them to play a bigger role in economic and social diversification in line with Vision 2030, prominent businesswomen said on Friday.

Hind Khalid Al-Zahid was the first Saudi woman designated as an executive director — for Dammam Airport Company — and also heads the Businesswomen Center at the Eastern Province Chamber of Commerce and Industry. 

She sees the historic move as a huge step forward for businesswomen in the Kingdom.

“Women being allowed to drive is very important; of course this will help a lot in sustainable development as the lifting of the ban on women driving came as a wonderful opportunity to increase women’s participation in the workforce,” she told Arab News on Friday, ahead of the end of the ban on Sunday.

She added that women in the job market are under-represented; they make up to 22 percent of the national workforce of about six million according to official estimates. Lifting the ban will help to take women’s representation in the workforce to 30 percent by 2030, she said.

“This is not just the right thing to do for women’s emancipation, but also an essential step in economic and social development as part of the reforms,” she said.

She said that there were different obstacles in increasing women’s participation in the workforce and other productive activities, and the driving ban was one of them. It was a strategic issue that needed to be addressed on a priority basis. With the issue resolved, it would help immensely in giving Saudi women better representation as they would help to diversify the Saudi economy and society.

She said that women could contribute hugely to the workforce and labor market as half of Saudi human resources were female, and unless allowed to excel in different sectors it would not be possible to do better, mainly because of restricted mobility.

A recent survey by the Jeddah Chamber of Commerce indicated that transportation was a major concern holding Saudi women back from joining the labor market.

Nouf Ibrahim, a businesswoman in Riyadh, said: “It will surely boost female economic participation and help increase women’s representation in the workforce immensely. It will also help to reduce the overall national unemployment rate as most of the unemployed are women and many of them are eligible as university graduates.”

She echoed the opinion that the move would help to bring an economic windfall for Saudi women, making it easier for them to work and do business, and thus play a bigger and better role that would help economic and social diversification in line with Saudi Vision 2030.

“Being able to drive from Sunday onwards after the ban is lifted will be a wonderful experience. Earlier we were dependent on a male family member and house driver to take us to workplace, to the shopping center, school or other required places for some work, now we can drive and that will allow active participation in productive work,” Sulafa Hakami, a Saudi woman working as the digital communication manager with an American MNC in Riyadh, told Arab News.

“Saudi women can now share effectively the bigger and better responsibilities,” she said.