Affordable show caters for all types of wallets

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Updated 12 December 2012
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Affordable show caters for all types of wallets

For art lovers and collectors with tastes and wallets of all sizes, Jeddah Atelier Gallery of Art organized their 5th affordable art exhibition. Over 100 national and international Arab artists contributed more than 1,000 paintings, sculptures and other forms of art work.
The affordable art show is a discounted sale of art that was established by Hisham Qandeel artist and owner of the art center, to produce pieces of art that would be affordable for anyone. At the same time, the exhibition would give the artists a platform to show their talent.
The exhibition is still open for another 11 days, displaying art forms ranging from calligraphy, oil paintings, water colors, pencil drawing, graphics, portrait, sculptures to acrylic works on canvas. Famous artists as well as new, upcoming artists have produced them. All works can be bought for price starting from SR 500 up to SR 2,000.
“The importance of this exhibition is that artists from all around the Kingdom and Arab world participated. There are art works by big names, such as Taha Saban, Othman Al-Khazeem, Abdullah Hammas, Fahad Hijlan and many others. You will not find any painting more than SR 2,000,” said Qandeel.
Guest of honor and art collector Nadia Al-Zuhair Zahid appreciated the efforts of the artists and organizers to put up such a colorful event, with affordable art works that people can put in their homes and admire, even when they can’t afford to buy expensive art. “The idea behind organizing this exhibition is admirable. New artists get a push and the pieces on sale promote the talent of the younger generation,” said Al-Zuhair. This year’s exhibition is exceptional, because of the large number of participating artists and art forms, said Al-Zuhair. “We can see that the artists are growing over time and so is the exhibition,” she said.
Artist Ola Hijazi put her memories of traveling in different countries and her feelings at different times.
“Last year I based my work on words of love. This time I poured my feelings and travel experiences in different paintings. I want people to come and share what they feel and think, I want them to give their opinion,” said Hijazi.
Artist Ibtisam Qanzer also presented her first work. She used knife as a tool and experimented to develop her artwork. She made paintings of flowers and tried to put the colors in such a way that anyone who touches her painting can feel the touch of flowers petals.

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Ancient musical instruments get an airing in Athens

Updated 21 June 2018
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Ancient musical instruments get an airing in Athens

  • The phorminx, the kitharis, the krotala and the aulos — string and wind instruments reconstructed by musical group Lyravlos — echoed among marble statues in Athens’s National Archaeological Museum.
  • Music was an integral part of almost every aspect of ancient Greek society, from religious, to social to athletic events.

ATHENS: Hymns sung to the Greek gods thousands of years ago resonated from ancient musical instruments in Athens on Thursday, transporting a transfixed audience to antiquity.
The phorminx, the kitharis, the krotala and the aulos — string and wind instruments reconstructed by musical group Lyravlos — echoed among marble statues in Athens’s National Archaeological Museum as part of World Music Day celebrations.
A family of musicians, Lyravlos have recreated exact replicas of the ancient instruments from natural materials including animal shells, bones, hides and horns.
Music was an integral part of almost every aspect of ancient Greek society, from religious, to social to athletic events. Today only some 60 written scores of ancient Greek music have survived, said Lyravlos member Michael Stefos.
Stefos said they interpret them as best they can, relying on the accuracy of their recreated instruments.
“Joking aside, ancient CDs have never been found,” he said.
Their performance included a hymn to the god Apollo, pieces played at the musical festival of the ancient Pythian Games in Delphi and during wine-laden rituals to the god Dionysus.
Michael’s father Panayiotis Stefos, who heads the group, travels to museums at home and abroad studying ancient Greek antiquities and texts in order to recreate the instruments.
“Usually each instrument has a different sound. It is not something you can make on a computer, it will not be a carbon copy,” said Stefos.
The difference with modern day instruments?
“If someone holds it in their arms and starts playing, after a few minutes they don’t want to let it go, because it vibrates and pulsates with your body,” he said.
French tourist Helene Piaget, who watched the performance, said it was “inspiring.”
“One sees them on statues, on reliefs, and you can’t imagine what they might sound like,” she said.
World Music Day is an annual celebration that takes place on the summer solstice.