Al Jomaih rolls out all-new 2013 Cadillac ATS with ISO certificate

Updated 21 February 2013
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Al Jomaih rolls out all-new 2013 Cadillac ATS with ISO certificate

AL JOMAIH AUTOMOTIVE COMPANY (AAC), described as the largest GM dealer in the Middle East and one of the largest in the world, launched the all-new 2013 Cadillac ATS in Saudi Arabia, making its mark in the world’s best compact luxury cars.
The 2013 Cadillac ATS is equipped with CUE (Cadillac User Experience) — a top level infotainment unit that combines an 8.0-inch, haptic-feedback touchscreen with a voice-command system that is said to be adept in its comprehension of words and syntax. There is also a reconfigurable 5.7-inch display in the main instrument cluster and optional full-color head-up display.
Waleed Aljomaih, COO of Aljomaih, said the superb performance of the 2013 Cadillac ATS in the grueling tests conducted in Germany’s famed Nürburgring course, along with additional roads, race tracks and laboratories around the globe, attests to the superiority of the car in its class, and naming it as North American Car of the Year is not a surprise at all for the 2013 Cadillac ATS truly deserves it. ATS is the result of incredible commitment and focus. That’s the only method for creating a great performing luxury car.”
He added: “The 2013 ATS is without a doubt Cadillac’s best entry into the very competitive luxury performance car segment.”
Built to compete directly against the Audi A4, the BMW 3-series and Mercedes C-class, the 2013 Cadillac ATS reflects a new expression of Cadillac’s art & science execution philosophy, centered on a foundation of driving dynamics and mass efficiency. It is the most agile and lightweight Cadillac, with one of the lowest curb weights in the segment — less than 3,400 pounds (1,542 kg). All-wheel drive is available.
David Matta, Premium Brands Director at Al Jomaih, validating the superiority of 2013 ATS against competitor brands, said: “Cadillac truly has a car that doesn’t give an inch to any of its rivals.”
With the resulting driving comfort coupled with luxury the 2013 ATS offers, “it’s fair to say that measured by ‘light, nimble, fun’ and balance and inherent goodness, the ATS dominates other brands in its category,” Matta added, suggesting a good response from Saudi well-meaning customers who have the propensity for superior cars.
“In an era when so many car shoppers are rethinking what size car they need, the newest member of the Cadillac lineup is definitely a head turner,” he noted.
The 2.5L is rated at 202 horsepower (151 kW) and 191 lb.-ft. or torque (259 Nm), and the all-new 2.0L turbocharged four-cylinder is rated at 272 horsepower (203 kW) and 260 lb.-ft. of torque (353 Nm). The award-winning 3.6L V-6 is rated at 321 horsepower (239 kW) and 275 lb.-ft. of torque (373 Nm).
Meanwhile on Feb. 19, Aljomaih Automotive Company (AAC), the exclusive dealer for the luxury brand “Cadillac” in Saudi Arabia, gets international quality standards certificate ISO 9001:2008, for the second year in a row after Riyadh certificate. This international certification comes as a result for applying all international quality standards and thus passing all certification requirements which the company's headquarters in the Eastern province underwent last month.
International Standards Organization (ISO) quality tests are important factor for the development of work in big companies as well as to improve its performance in order to get such international certification. Last week, the company has undergone a comprehensive evaluation process in order to improve the performance of its quality management system to cope with the standards and criteria required in all divisions of the company to ensure its compliance with the requirements of ISO 9001:2008 certification.


Rare silk Qur’an helps preserve Afghanistan’s cultural heritage

Updated 23 May 2018
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Rare silk Qur’an helps preserve Afghanistan’s cultural heritage

  • Each of the Islamic holy book’s 610 pages was produced by hand in a painstaking process that took a team of 38 calligraphers and artists specializing in miniatures nearly two years to finish
  • Turquoise Mountain began work in 2006 in Kabul with the aim of preserving ancient Afghan craftsmanship, including ceramics, carpentry and calligraphy

KABUL: One of the only Qur’ans ever made from silk fabric has been completed in Afghanistan — a feat its creators hope will help preserve the country’s centuries-old tradition of calligraphy.
Each of the Islamic holy book’s 610 pages was produced by hand in a painstaking process that took a team of 38 calligraphers and artists specializing in miniatures nearly two years to finish.
Bound in goat leather and weighing 8.6 kilograms, the Qur’an was produced by Afghan artisans, many of them trained at British foundation Turquoise Mountain in Kabul.
“Our intention was to ensure that calligraphy does not die out in this country — writing is part of our culture,” Khwaja Qamaruddin Chishti, a 66-year-old master calligrapher, said in a cramped office inside Turquoise Mountain’s labyrinthine mud-brick and wood-paneled complex.
With the Qur’an considered a sacred text, calligraphy is highly venerated in Islam and Islamic art.
“When it comes to art we cannot put a price on it. God has entrusted us with this work (the Qur’an) ... and this means more to us than the financial aspect,” Chishti continued.
Using a bamboo or reed ink pen, Chishti and his fellow calligraphers spent up to two days carefully copying Qur’anic verses onto a single page — sometimes longer if they made a mistake and had to start again.
They used the Naskh script, a calligraphic style developed in early Islam to replace Kufic because it was easier to read and write.
The decoration around the script, known as illumination, was more time-consuming, each page taking more than a week to complete.
A team of artists used paint made from natural materials, including ground lapis, gold and bronze, to recreate the delicate patterns popular during the Timurid dynasty in the 15th and 16th centuries in the western city of Herat.
“All the colors we have used are from nature,” Mohammad Tamim Sahibzada, a master miniature artist who was responsible for creating the vibrant colors used in the Qur’an, said.
Sahibzada said working on silk fabric for the first time was challenging. The locally sourced material — all 305 meters (1,000 feet) of it — was treated in a solution made from the dried seeds of ispaghula, or psyllium, to stop the ink from spreading.
Turquoise Mountain began work in 2006 in Kabul with the aim of preserving ancient Afghan craftsmanship, including ceramics, carpentry and calligraphy.
It hopes the silk Qur’an will generate demand for more handmade Islamic religious texts that could create employment for its artisans and help finance the institute.
“We will show it to other Islamic countries to see if it is possible to create job opportunities for graduates to work on another Qur’an,” said Abdul Waheed Khalili, the organization’s Afghan director.
For now, it will be kept in a specially made hand-carved walnut wooden box to protect its delicate pages from the elements at Turquoise Mountain’s offices, which are in the restored Murad Khani, a historic commercial and residential area in Kabul’s oldest district.
There Turquoise Mountain has trained thousands of artisans with the support of Britain’s Prince Charles, the British Council, and USAID.
“The copying of the Qur’an onto silk is very rare,” country director Nathan Stroupe said.
He said the project has been “an amazing way to train our students at an incredibly high level in a very traditional type of work.”
“If a book collector in London... was interested in it, we would be thinking in the $100,000 to $200,000 (price) range,” he added.