Al-Qaeda's No. 2 in Arabian Peninsula reported dead

Updated 23 January 2013
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Al-Qaeda's No. 2 in Arabian Peninsula reported dead

DUBAI: The second-in-command of Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) has died, a radical Islamist said in his Twitter account, according to a Wednesday report by the SITE Intelligence group.
The Islamist, identified as Abdullah bin Muhammad, said that Saeed Al-Shehri, a Saudi, has died “after a long journey in fighting the Zio-Crusader campaign,” according to SITE.
Muhammad gave no details about Shehri’s alleged death which also remained unconfirmed by Islamist websites and the Saudi and Yemeni authorities.
However, the local daily Al-Hayat reported on Wednesday that members of Shehri’s family said he had died of wounds sustained in a US drone attack in Yemen during the second half of December.
Last October, Shehri denied a September 10 announcement by Yemen’s defense ministry that he had been killed in an army raid, in an audio message posted on extremist Internet forums.
The militant leader was released from Guantanamo Bay in Cuba in 2007 and was flown to Saudi Arabia where he was put through a rehabilitation program.
But after completing the program, Shehri disappeared and later resurfaced as AQAP’s No. 2.
AQAP, led by Nasser Al-Wuhayshi, is classified by the United States as the most active and deadly franchise in the global Al-Qaeda network.
In October 2000, AQAP militants attacked US Navy destroyer the USS Cole in Yemen’s port of Aden, killing 17 sailors and wounding 40 more.
Although weakened, the group continues to launch deadly attacks on Western and government targets across Yemen.


Letter to Qatar: Abandon PR, change attitude, and siege would be lifted

Updated 25 April 2018
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Letter to Qatar: Abandon PR, change attitude, and siege would be lifted

LONDON: Four Arab ambassadors have called on Qatar to improve relations with its neighbors, change its attitude and stop its support for extremism, terror and destabilization in the region.

The four ambassadors of Saudi Arabia (Mohammed bin Nawwa), Bahrain (Fawaz bin Mohammed Al-Khalifa), the UAE (Suleiman Al-Mazroui) and Egypt (Nasser Kamel) co-wrote a letter published on Wednesday in the Financial Times to answer an FT lead article titled “Qatar siege is meaningless.”

The ambassadors stressed in the letter that their governments had no plans to incorporate Qatar, as the FT claimed, but all they hoped for is that the Doha government committed to the international criteria to fight terrorism and “stop its support for terror and extremism in the region.”

In the letter, the four ambassadors reminded the paper that the prime minister of Qatar attended the wedding of the son of Abdel Rahman Al-Nueimi,who is listed on a US terror list, and is the main conduit to Al-Qaeda in Iraq where, according to the US, he funnelled millions of US dollars to the organization there.

The ambassadors added that Al-Nueimi is one of many sponsors of terror living and working in Qatar.

The ambassadors drew the readers’ attention to Qatar’s “double standard behavior” — saying one thing to the West, and doing the opposite.

They concluded the letter by demonstrating Qatar’s “duplicity.”

They said that Qatar has recently intensified the use of its media and PR to promote and support terror in the Middle East generally and in Saudi Arabia especially.

Recently Qatari broadcasters opened their airwaves to Houthi militia in Yemen and its propaganda calling for attacking Saudi Arabia.

In conclusion the ambassadors called on Doha to quit its public relations campaign and change its attitude — only then would the siege be over.