All-new Kia Cerato: Third-generation sedan

Updated 23 January 2013
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All-new Kia Cerato: Third-generation sedan

KIA’s most successful model, the Cerato (also known as the K3 in Korea and Forte in some countries), has achieved more than 2.5 million global sales since its introduction in 2004, including 445,000 units in 2011 when the second-generation model accounted for almost 18 percent of Kia’s total worldwide sales.
Now, an all-new version of the Cerato sedan is scheduled to go on sale during this month (January) at Aljabr Automotive Showrooms in Saudi Arabia, to be followed by five-door hatchback and two-door coupe variants of the new model later in the year.
Sporting a sleeker profile with futuristic and dynamic styling, the all-new Cerato sedan is longer, lower and wider than the current car, with an extended wheelbase. It features an all-new re-engineered bodyshell structure and will also boast improved quality, upgraded equipment with a host of additional convenience and safety features, a more spacious cabin with enhanced quality, improved refinement and an upgraded powertrain line-up that delivers class-leading fuel economy.
“Cerato has become our brand’s biggest-selling export model, so the introduction of its third-generation is hugely significant for Kia,” commented Aljabr’s Automotive Vice President Abdulsalam Aljabr.
The original Kia Cerato focused on quality and price, and recorded sales of 1.23 million units. The second-generation vehicle introduced in 2008, majored on design, quality and value. It has achieved more than 1.21 million sales around the world so far.
“We are raising our game once again with the all-new Cerato, which adds emotional appeal to its established core values of design, quality and value,” adds Aljabr. “This all-new model will boost our competitiveness in the compact car segment — known as the C-segment in many countries —which is one of the world’s most important and closely fought marketplaces.”
While creating the all-new Cerato, Kia’s designers and engineers have listened closely to customer feedback. The resulting new car is a bold demonstration of Kia’s determination to deliver models, which exceed customer expectations and provide a rewarding long-term ownership experience for Kia buyers.
The result of 42 months design, engineering and development work and an investment of more than 300 billion Korean won ($ 250 million), the third-generation Cerato models will be manufactured at Kia’s Hwasung facility in Korea.


Unmapped roads raise risk to Southeast Asian rainforests — study

An aerial photo of a road running through an palm plantation in Dumai, Riau, Sumatra island, Indonesia. (Antara Foto/Rony Muharrman/via REUTERS/File)
Updated 25 min 31 sec ago
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Unmapped roads raise risk to Southeast Asian rainforests — study

  • Researcher Alice Hughes found that roads have penetrated areas previously considered untouched and unreachable by vehicles.
  • An average of 75 percent of roads in five countries were missing from OpenStreetMap (OSM), a mapping platform widely used by researchers and academics.

KUALA LUMPUR: Forests in parts of Southeast Asia face greater threats than previously thought because researchers often rely on data that ignores new roads, which are precursors to deforestation and development, a study shows.
The paper, published this month by the journal Biological Conservation, showed that an average of 75 percent of roads in five countries were missing from OpenStreetMap (OSM), a mapping platform widely used by researchers and academics.
“Large-scale forest clearance is preceded by the growth of road networks, which provide a stark warning for the region’s future,” the study said.
Author Alice Hughes, a researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, studied a total of 277,281 square kilometers by analyzing satellite images and maps showing forest loss and coverage, as well as agriculture concessions.
She found that roads have penetrated areas previously considered untouched and unreachable by vehicles.
“We are deluding ourselves that we still have large tracts of inaccessible, pristine forest, when the reality is highly-fragmented, very accessible forests,” Hughs said on Friday.
Her research examined road networks in parts of Malaysia, Indonesia, Brunei, Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands.
“In some parts of the region, up to 99 percent of roads on those global maps, which are used as the basis for a huge amount of further analysis, are not included,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.
Deforestation and development of forests in the area studied have occurred at a rapid pace since 2000, said Hughes, while maps used by researchers do not regularly update their road data.
“Most of the time these roads are just providing access to forests and up to 99 percent of deforestation is within 2.5 km of road,” she said. “They are clearly the access method.”
She added that the region urgently needs better protection and enforcement for its remaining forests.
Indonesia, which is the world’s biggest palm oil producer, introduced a forest clearing moratorium in 2011 to help reduce deforestation.
Hughes said the ban should be expanded beyond just land designated as natural, untouched primary forest to include all high biodiversity forests.
Hughes’ research methodology should be used to determine whether the same patterns exist in other parts of the world, said Christopher Martius, team leader for climate change at the Indonesia-based Center for International Forestry Research.
“It is surprising that nobody ever did that before, and it is shocking that the result shows we grossly underestimated the possible threat to tropical forests from road building,” he said by email.