Apple ordered to pay $368 million in patent case

Updated 07 November 2012
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Apple ordered to pay $368 million in patent case

WASHINGTON: Apple has been ordered to pay $368 million for patent infringement in its use of Facetime, an application that allows for video calls on mobile devices, the plaintiff said Wednesday.
Security software firm VirnetX said in a statement the jury in a federal court in Texas ordered the payment “for infringing four VirnetX patents” and that the court will hear post-trial motions in the upcoming weeks.
“We are extremely pleased with the outcome of our suit with Apple,” said Kendall Larsen, VirnetX chief executive and president. “This victory further establishes the importance of our patent portfolio.”
VirnetX alleged in its suit that Apple should have paid a licensing fee to use the technologies allowing for secure connections using Facetime.
Apple did not immediately respond to an AFP request for comment.
VirnetX had sued Apple, Cisco Systems and others in 2010 for patent infringement. It alleged Apple’s iPhone and iPod Touch infringed on the patents, which allow a type of virtual private network for secure mobile video calls.


Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

Updated 17 April 2018
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Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

  • Previous research has shown a new blood test has potential to detect eight different kinds of tumors before they spread
  • The research starts in April and will run until September

TOKYO: A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.
Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.
It will now begin testing the method using some 250 urine samples, to see if samples at room temperature are suitable for analysis, Hitachi spokesman Chiharu Odaira told AFP.
“If this method is put to practical use, it will be a lot easier for people to get a cancer test, as there will be no need to go to a medical organization for a blood test,” he said.
It is also intended to be used to detect paediatric cancers.
“That will be especially beneficial in testing for small children” who are often afraid of needles, added Odaira.
Research published earlier this year demonstrated that a new blood test has shown promise toward detecting eight different kinds of tumors before they spread elsewhere in the body.
Usual diagnostic methods for breast cancer consist of a mammogram followed by a biopsy if a risk is detected.
For colon cancer, screening is generally conducted via a stool test and a colonoscopy for patients at high risk.
The Hitachi technology centers around detecting waste materials inside urine samples that act as a “biomarker” — a naturally occurring substance by which a particular disease can be identified, the company said in a statement.
The procedure aims to improve the early detection of cancer, saving lives and reducing the medical and social cost to the country, Odaira explained.
The experiment will start this month until through September in cooperation with Nagoya University in central Japan.
“We aim to put the technology in use in the 2020s, although this depends on various things such as getting approval from the authorities,” Odaira said.