Artist refuses to sell her painting of King Salman

1 / 2
2 / 2
Updated 23 July 2015

Artist refuses to sell her painting of King Salman

JEDDAH: Custodian of the Two Holy Mosque King Salman has become the king of justice, who is loved by the people of Saudi Arabia, not only as a fair ruler but also as the father of the nation.

Yaara Munshi, a 20-year-old Saudi engineering student at King Abdulaziz University, has drawn almost 300 paintings reflecting her love and respect for the Kingdom, Saudi culture and traditions, life style and a special painting of King Salman, and put them on display during an exhibition at the Jeddah festival.
Munshi’s colorful paintings reflect her philosophical vision in abstract art and her sense for painting. Her painting of King Salman caught the eye of hundreds, but she refused to sell the unique piece of art.
“This painting is not for sale as I want to present it myself to the beloved king. It is my dream to meet the king of justice on behalf of the girls of Makkah, and thank him for everything he is doing for the sons and daughters of the homeland,” she said.
Munshi explained that she loves to paint and is very excited that a number of people liked her work of art, specially the painting of King Salman, which shows creativity, beauty and power.
Munshi follows the old traditional schools of art but does not ignore modern techniques and painting styles.
She also drew a large panel of the Grand Mosque and the expansion that is taking place, a message of modern art and civilization which the government is using in the construction of the Two Holy Mosques.


Cinema Akil founder brings the magic of independent movies to Dubai

Updated 18 August 2019

Cinema Akil founder brings the magic of independent movies to Dubai

  • Butheina Kazim founded Cinema Akil in 2014 as a platform for independent cinema
  • Kazim’s next goal is to expand the Cinema Akil concept from Dubai to the region

DUBAI:  Butheina Kazim has brought the magic of art-house movies to Dubai, through her project Cinema Akil.

Having worked in television, radio and film acquisitions, Butheina Kazim founded Cinema Akil in 2014 as a platform for independent cinema. For Kazim, who has also produced her own film “Letters to Palestine,” the project is about more than just watching films, it’s also for building community. 

She introduced the concept with pop-up screenings, but since last year Cinema Akil has a permanent theatre in Dubai’s art district on Al-Serkal Avenue. Step into the 133-seater theater, and you are transported to an old-school picture house.

“The permanent space allows us to release films every single night of the year. The programming is often exclusive and can’t be seen elsewhere,” said Kazim. But the pop-up format will always be part of Cinema Akil. “Our nomadic life allows us to reach different communities by bringing free public cinema to people.” 

Kazim works closely with special events such as Dubai Shopping Festival’s Market Out of the Box and Fashion Forward initiatives and has screened over 350 films across Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Sharjah.

In summer, the cinema space’s robust line-up continues. “There’s a mythical Dubai exodus that everyone speaks of as soon as summer hits,” said Kazim. Some of Cinema Akil’s August highlights include “Straight Out of Berlin,” a series of eight films in collaboration with the Goethe Institut, which explores the many faces and tunnels of the German capital city.

There was even a “Cat Weekend” on International Cat Day earlier this month, when films that celebrate all things feline were screened.

Kazim has been encouraged by the region’s response to art cinema: “We’ve been blown away by the enthusiasm. Films we never expected to succeed, such “Cold War” by Pawel Pawlikowski and “Capernaum” by Nadine Labaki, had a wonderful response. It’s magical when that happens.”

Kazim’s next goal is to expand the Cinema Akil concept from Dubai to the region, giving cinephiles all over the Gulf a chance to enjoy independent films.