Artist refuses to sell her painting of King Salman

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Updated 23 July 2015
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Artist refuses to sell her painting of King Salman

JEDDAH: Custodian of the Two Holy Mosque King Salman has become the king of justice, who is loved by the people of Saudi Arabia, not only as a fair ruler but also as the father of the nation.

Yaara Munshi, a 20-year-old Saudi engineering student at King Abdulaziz University, has drawn almost 300 paintings reflecting her love and respect for the Kingdom, Saudi culture and traditions, life style and a special painting of King Salman, and put them on display during an exhibition at the Jeddah festival.
Munshi’s colorful paintings reflect her philosophical vision in abstract art and her sense for painting. Her painting of King Salman caught the eye of hundreds, but she refused to sell the unique piece of art.
“This painting is not for sale as I want to present it myself to the beloved king. It is my dream to meet the king of justice on behalf of the girls of Makkah, and thank him for everything he is doing for the sons and daughters of the homeland,” she said.
Munshi explained that she loves to paint and is very excited that a number of people liked her work of art, specially the painting of King Salman, which shows creativity, beauty and power.
Munshi follows the old traditional schools of art but does not ignore modern techniques and painting styles.
She also drew a large panel of the Grand Mosque and the expansion that is taking place, a message of modern art and civilization which the government is using in the construction of the Two Holy Mosques.


Hoda Barakat wins Arab Booker for ‘The Night Mail’

Updated 24 April 2019
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Hoda Barakat wins Arab Booker for ‘The Night Mail’

  • The author will receive a prize of $50,000 for her winning novel “The Night Mail”
  • The book includes a series of letters from individuals who are facing social and personal issues

ABU DHABI: Lebanese author Hoda Barakat has won the Booker international prize for Arabic fiction for her novel “The Night Mail.”
She will receive $50,000 and the five other authors who reached the final short-list will each receive $10,000, the organizers revealed late Tuesday.
Conceived in Abu Dhabi in 2007, the prize is supported by the Booker Prize Foundation in London and financed by Abu Dhabi’s Department of Culture and Tourism.
Born in Beirut, Hoda Barakat lives in Paris and has published several novels including “The Stone of Laughter” and “My Master and My Lover.”
“The Night Mail” is her sixth novel and has been translated into French.
Alongside the prize money, funds will also be provided for translating the book into English.
The novel consists of a series of letters by individuals “facing social misery and their own demons,” according to publisher Actes Sud.
Abu Dhabi, capital of the emirate of the same name, has become an increasingly significant cultural hub.
The city hosts the Louvre Abu Dhabi — the first museum to take the name “Louvre” outside France — which houses nearly 600 works in a futuristic building designed by French architect Jean Nouvel.