Artist refuses to sell her painting of King Salman

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Updated 23 July 2015
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Artist refuses to sell her painting of King Salman

JEDDAH: Custodian of the Two Holy Mosque King Salman has become the king of justice, who is loved by the people of Saudi Arabia, not only as a fair ruler but also as the father of the nation.

Yaara Munshi, a 20-year-old Saudi engineering student at King Abdulaziz University, has drawn almost 300 paintings reflecting her love and respect for the Kingdom, Saudi culture and traditions, life style and a special painting of King Salman, and put them on display during an exhibition at the Jeddah festival.
Munshi’s colorful paintings reflect her philosophical vision in abstract art and her sense for painting. Her painting of King Salman caught the eye of hundreds, but she refused to sell the unique piece of art.
“This painting is not for sale as I want to present it myself to the beloved king. It is my dream to meet the king of justice on behalf of the girls of Makkah, and thank him for everything he is doing for the sons and daughters of the homeland,” she said.
Munshi explained that she loves to paint and is very excited that a number of people liked her work of art, specially the painting of King Salman, which shows creativity, beauty and power.
Munshi follows the old traditional schools of art but does not ignore modern techniques and painting styles.
She also drew a large panel of the Grand Mosque and the expansion that is taking place, a message of modern art and civilization which the government is using in the construction of the Two Holy Mosques.


Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in Peru

Updated 16 February 2019
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Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in Peru

  • The discovery was made on the Mata Indio dig site in the northern Lambayeque region
  • Despite evidence of looting, archaeologists recovered items including vases

LIMA: Peruvian archaeologists discovered an Incan tomb in the north of the country where an elite member of the pre-Columbian empire was buried, one of the investigators announced Friday.
The discovery was made on the Mata Indio dig site in the northern Lambayeque region, archaeologist Luis Chero told state news agency Andina.
Archaeologists believe the tomb belonged to a noble Inca based on the presence of “spondylus,” a type of sea shell always present in the graves of important figures from the Incan period, which lasted from the 12th to the 16th centuries.
The tomb had been broken into multiple times, possibly in search of treasure. But despite evidence of looting, archaeologists recovered items including vases.
The tomb also had unique architecture including hollows for the placement of idols.
Chero said the findings “demonstrate the majesty and importance of this site,” located 1,000 kilometers north of the capital Lima, and 2,000 kilometers from Cusco — capital of the Inca empire which stretched from southern Colombia to central Chile.