Blast hits govt office in Benghazi

Updated 01 January 2013
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Blast hits govt office in Benghazi

BENGHAZI: An improvised bomb exploded outside the headquarters of the public prosecutor in the Libyan city of Benghazi causing material damage but no fatalities, a security source said yesterday.
“Initial evidence suggests the device was a suitcase packed with high yield explosives (TNT),” an investigator at the scene said.
The overnight blast marked the third attack on the site in 2012. It damaged the front of the recently renovated building. The bomb also punched a hole in the ground and shattered glasses in the buildings.


Houthi militias use children to plant mines in liberated areas: minister

Updated 12 min 37 sec ago
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Houthi militias use children to plant mines in liberated areas: minister

  • Yemen’s minister of human rights revealed that Houthi militias backed by Iran are using children to plant mines in areas that they are being expelled from.
  • Askar explained that Houthi militias used different types of mines, including anti-personnel mines which are banned in residential areas and are very dangerous, and camouflaged and improvised mines.

LONDON: Yemen’s minister of human rights Dr. Mohammed Askar revealed that Houthi militias backed by Iran are using children to plant mines in areas that they are being expelled from. He also said that they are planting bombs in houses, hospitals, and places of worship, threatening civilians.
Askar explained that Houthi militias used different types of mines, including anti-personnel mines which are banned in residential areas and are very dangerous, and camouflaged and improvised mines.
The Houthi militias have also invented new ways of using anti-vehicle mines and transforming them so that they can be used as anti-personnel mines with the intention of killing and injuring as many people as possible.
He added that Houthi militias have exploited the difficult economic and social conditions and the complex tribal nature of Yemen to attract and recruit children.
Many families send their children to join the Houthis in exchange for 50,000 Yemeni riyals ($150) in order to fulfil their daily needs, especially in large families.
Houthis are also carrying out campaigns to religiously mobilize children in Saudi where students are given weekly lessons on the benefits of war.