British universities receive Saudi funds

Updated 30 September 2012
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British universities receive Saudi funds

JEDDAH: Over the past decade, Saudi Arabia has been the largest source of donations from Islamic states and royal families to British universities, much of which is devoted to the study of Islam, the Middle East and Arabic literature.
A large share of this money went toward establishing Islamic study centers. In 2008, Prince Alwaleed bin Talal donated £8 million (SR 48.5 million) each to Cambridge and Edinburgh for this purpose, Al-Eqtisadiah business daily reported yesterday.
Oxford has been the largest British beneficiary of Saudi support. In 2005, Prince Sultan, the late crown prince, gave £2 million (SR 12 million) to the Ashmolean Museum. In 2001, the King Abdul Aziz Foundation gave £1 million (SR 6.1 million) to the Middle East Center.
There are many other donors. Oxford’s £75 million (SR 454.6 million) Islamic Studies Center was supported by 12 Muslim countries. Ruler of Oman, Sultan Qaboos bin Said, gave £3.1 million (SR 18.8 million) to Cambridge to fund two posts, including a chair of Arabic.
Ruler of Sharjah, Sheikh Sultan bin Mohammed Al-Qassimi, has supported Exeter’s Islamic studies center with more than £5 million (SR 30 million) since 2001. Trinity Saint David, part of the University of Wales, has received donations from the ruler of Abu Dhabi Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al-Nahyan.
While Islamic studies are the most popular target for donors, support is certainly not restricted to the subject. The Saïd Business School at Oxford University was set up by Wafic Said, a Syrian-Saudi businessman, with a £23 million (SR 139.4 million) initial donation. 
Donations are not the only financial links to the Gulf. According to the Observatory for Borderless Higher Education, of the 200 branch campuses opened by universities around the world, 37 are in the UAE and 10 are in Qatar.
University College London has an archaeology campus in Qatar. Bolton, Heriot-Watt, the London Business School, Manchester Business School, Cass Business School and Middlesex have bases in Dubai or neighboring Ras Al-Khaimah, the newspaper said quoting the Financial Times.
These satellite campuses have two purposes: for countries that need to expand their higher education rapidly, it allows them to build capacity. For the university – if they can make them work – it allows them to tap potentially lucrative markets.


Saudi Arabia’s air defense intercepts Houthi ballistic missile fired towards Jazan

Updated 20 April 2018
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Saudi Arabia’s air defense intercepts Houthi ballistic missile fired towards Jazan

  • Earlier this week, Saudi air defenses shot down a previous ballistic missile attack by the Houthis
  • The incident happened hours after the coalition warned of a “painful” response if the Houthis mounted new attacks on Saudi Arabia

Saudi air defense forces managed to intercept a ballistic missile fired by Houthi militias from Yemen headed in the direction of Saudi Arabia’s border province of Jazan on Friday.

Earlier this week, Saudi air defenses shot down a previous ballistic missile attack by the Houthis.

Colonel Turki Al-Maliki, the coalition's spokesman, said the missile was monitored by the Saudi Air Force to have been launched from Yemen's Amran province at 10:16 p.m. Monday toward populated areas in the southern Saudi province of Najran.

The missile was intercepted before it could hit its target, Al-Maliki said.

The incident happened hours after the coalition warned of a “painful” response if the Houthis mounted new attacks on Saudi Arabia using what it said were Iran-supplied drones.

So far, the Houthis have launched over 100 missiles at Saudi cities and installations.