Bryant and wife Vanessa reconcile

Updated 12 January 2013
0

Bryant and wife Vanessa reconcile

LOS ANGELES: Los Angeles Lakers superstar Kobe Bryant and his wife, Vanessa, confirmed Friday they have reconciled in posts on social media.
Vanessa Bryant, who had filed for divorce from the NBA star in December of 2011, posted a message on Instagram, and Bryant said on his Facebook page that the couple were back together.
“We are pleased to announce that we have reconciled,” Vanessa Bryant wrote. “Our divorce action will be dismissed. We are looking forward to our future together. Kobe & Vanessa.” “I am happy to say that Vanessa and I are moving on with our lives together as a family,” Bryant posted on Facebook. “When the show ends and the music stops, the journey is made beautiful by having that someone to share it with.
“Thank you all for your support and prayers!” Bryant added.
The Bryants married in 2000. Vanessa stood by her husband after he was charged with sexually assaulting a Colorado woman in 2003, charges that were eventually dropped.
Vanessa Bryant filed papers in Orange County Superior Court in Santa Ana, California, in December of 2011 citing “irreconcilable differences” as the reason for seeking a divorce.
However, the two continued to work together for various charitable causes and the celebrity website TMZ reported last June that they were working toward a reconciliation.
They have two daughters, nine-year-old Natalia and six-year-old Gianna.


Danish Kaneria admits guilt in spot-fixing scandal

Updated 18 October 2018
0

Danish Kaneria admits guilt in spot-fixing scandal

LONDON: Pakistan’s Danish Kaneria has finally admitted his role in a fixing scandal that led to the imprisonment of former Essex team-mate Mervyn Westfield after six years of denials.
Kaneria, who was given a life ban by English cricket chiefs that effectively applied worldwide, said: “My name is Danish Kaneria and I admit that I was guilty of the two charges brought against me by the England and Wales Cricket Board in 2012.”
Leg-spinner Kaneria, who insisted he was repentant as he called for his life ban to be overturned, added: “I want to apologize to Mervyn Westfield, my Essex team-mates, my Essex cricket club, my Essex cricket fans. I say sorry to Pakistan.”
Westfield spent two months at Belmarsh prison in south-east London after pleading guilty to accepting £6,000 ($7,862) from an illegal bookmaker, Anu Bhatt, to concede 12 runs in his first over of an English county 40-over game against Durham in 2009. He conceded only 10, but still took the money.
Kaneria was the “middle-man” in the scam, having introduced Westfield to Bhatt, but avoided criminal charges when English legal authorities decided they lacked the evidence for a conviction.
Now 37, Kaneria remains Pakistan’s leading spinner with 261 Test wickets.

FORGIVENESS

He last played for Pakistan in the Trent Bridge Test of 2010, and has not appeared in any first-class game since March 2012, with all major boards upholding the ECB ban under International Cricket Council guidance.
“I want to ask people’s forgiveness,” said Kaneria.
“Cricket has given me so much in my life and I want to give something back.
“If the ECB and ICC and other bodies would give me a second chance I can help to educate young people in cricket, teach them that if you do wrong you are finished like me.”
Kaneria said the fear of embarrassing his father, who died in 2013 and had been suffering from cancer, explained part of the reason behind his repeated denials of wrongdoing.
“His health was getting worse and worse,” he recalled.
“I didn’t have the courage to face him and tell him that I was wrong. He was a very, very proud guy. Very, very proud of me and what I did, representing Pakistan, representing my country.
“I want to apologize to my father, who has always been a role model for me.”
Meanwhile Westfield told the Daily Mail he accepted Kaneria’s apology, saying: “This whole chapter of spot-fixing changed my life, but I have never blamed anyone for the terrible mistake I made.
“However, opening up about my wrongdoing and telling the truth allowed me to move on,” added Westfield, now 30, who was banned from professional cricket for five years after being released from jail but has since played club and minor county matches.
“I hope that Danish finds peace and closure by doing this, and I wish him all the best for the future.”