Cartoonist Raslan arrested in Syria

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Updated 16 October 2012
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Cartoonist Raslan arrested in Syria

JEDDAH: The Syrian authorities have arrested cartoonist Akram Raslan of government-owned Al-Fida newspaper after he published cartoons underlining the tragic situation in the country, where a crisis has ignited a civil war.
Raslan worked with Arab News earlier this year. He was born in the city of Souran in 1974, graduated with a literature major from Damascus University in 1996, and worked for Syrian and Lebanese newspapers before he was hired by the Hamah-based Al-Fida newspaper.
One of his colleagues, who preferred to remain anonymous, said there is no information about his condition under detention, but fears of him being harmed by the Syrian authorities are real. “He was arrested because of his drawings that described the poor conditions Syrians are living in after the regime’s forces increased their acts of violence,” he said.
Last year, the Syrian authorities arrested cartoonist Ali Farazat while he driving home from work. They brutally beat him and broke his fingers.

 

To see some of Akram Raslan's latest Assad cartoons published in Arab News, please click on the links below:

http://www.arabnews.com/?q=cartoon-%E2%80%94-akramrslan-13

http://www.arabnews.com/?q=cartoon-%E2%80%94-akramrslan-12

http://www.arabnews.com/?q=cartoon&page=1


Al-Jubeir:  Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, said Saudi Arabia's foreign minister. (AFP)
Updated 16 November 2018
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Al-Jubeir:  Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

  • Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, says Saudi FM
  • Al-Jubeir: Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict

RIYADH: The Saudi-led coalition is working with UN envoy Martin Griffith to reach a political solution to the conflict in Yemen based on UN Security Council resolution 2216, the Gulf Initiative and the outcomes of Yemeni national dialogue, the Saudi foreign minister said on Thursday. 

“Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, and the solution should lead to the restoration of legitimacy in Yemen,” said Adel Al-Jubeir.

“We support a peaceful solution in Yemen. We support the efforts of the UN envoy for the Yemeni cause,” he added.

“We are committed to providing all humanitarian support to our brothers there. We are also working on the post-war reconstruction of Yemen.” The Kingdom supports the envoy’s efforts to hold negotiations at the end of November, added Al-Jubeir.

Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict, he said.

In contrast, Houthi militias are imposing restrictions on Yemeni cities and villages, leading to starvation, he added. 

They are also seizing humanitarian aid and preventing Yemenis from getting cholera vaccinations, Al-Jubeir said. 

The Houthis fire ballistic missiles indiscriminately at Saudi Arabia, use children as fighters and plant mines across Yemen, he added. 

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, he said.

Saudi Arabia did not want the conflict in Yemen; it was imposed on the Kingdom, Al-Jubeir added. 

Saudi Arabia worked with other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member states to develop the Gulf Initiative. 

This led to a transition from former President Ali Abdullah Saleh to the internationally recognized government headed by current President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi.

The Kingdom also worked to develop Yemeni national dialogue that led to a Yemeni vision regarding the country’s future.

A new Yemeni constitution was about to be drafted when the Houthis seized much of the country, including the capital. 

Yemen’s legitimate government requested support, and the Saudi-led coalition responded under Article 51 of the UN Charter.