Catholic brotherhood ‘must share liability’ in UK abuse case

Updated 21 November 2012
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Catholic brotherhood ‘must share liability’ in UK abuse case

LONDON: A Catholic brotherhood which sent teachers to work at a residential school in England can be held legally responsible for the sexual abuse of boys over a 40-year period, senior judges ruled on Wednesday.
The Supreme Court ruling is considered a landmark judgment which could affect claims of abuse at other institutions because judges said the brotherhood must share liability along with the local diocese.
The court in London heard that about 170 men are seeking damages from the De La Salle Brotherhood after claiming they were abused at St. William’s school in East Yorkshire, northern England, between 1952 and 1992.
The school educated boys aged 10 to 16 with emotional and behavioral problems. It closed in 1994.
The headmaster of the school, James Carragher, was jailed for 14 years in 2004 for sexually abusing vulnerable boys over a period of 20 years.
The 170 claimants say they were abused by Carragher and other brothers at the school, judges said.
The Court of Appeal ruled in 2010 that the Catholic diocese in which the school lay — the Middlesbrough Diocese — was solely responsible for a compensation claim amounting to £8 million (10 million euros, $12.7 million).
But the Supreme Court judges ruled it was “fair, just and reasonable” for the De La Salle Brotherhood, also known as the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, to share liability with the diocese in this case.
Cases of sexual abuse at Catholic-run schools and children’s homes have rocked countries such as Ireland, the United States and Germany in recent years.


86 people killed in central Nigeria violence: police

Updated 19 min 35 sec ago
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86 people killed in central Nigeria violence: police

  • Analysts believe it could become Nigeria’s biggest security concern, eclipsing Boko Haram’s Islamist insurgency that has left at least 20,000 dead since 2009
  • The violence — fueled by ethnic, religious and political allegiances — has killed thousands over several decades

JOS, Nigeria: Eighty-six people have been killed in an attack by suspected nomadic herders against farming communities in restive central Nigeria, police said on Sunday.
The discovery in the Barikin Ladi area of Plateau state came after days of violence apparently sparked by an attack by ethnic Berom farmers on Fulani herders on Thursday.
State police commissioner Undie Adie said a search of Berom villages in the area following clashes on Saturday found “86 persons altogether were killed.”
Adie told reporters six people were also injured and 50 houses razed. Bodies of those who died have been released to their families, he added.
The deaths are the latest in a long-running battle for land and resources that is putting President Muhammadu Buhari under pressure as elections approach next year.
The violence — fueled by ethnic, religious and political allegiances — has killed thousands over several decades.
Analysts believe it could become Nigeria’s biggest security concern, eclipsing Boko Haram’s Islamist insurgency that has left at least 20,000 dead since 2009.
The Plateau state government said it had imposed restrictions on movements in the Riyom, Barikin Ladi and Jos South areas “to avert a breakdown of law and order.”
“The curfew takes effect immediately... and movement is restricted from 6:00 p.m. (1700 GMT) to 6:00 am, except (for) those on essential duties,” said spokesman Rufus Bature.
On Sunday, ethnic Berom youths set up barricades on the Jos-Abuja highway and attacked motorists who looked “Fulani and Muslim,” according to those who escaped the violence.
Plateau state police spokesman Tyopev Terna and Major Adam Umar, from the military taskforce in the state capital, Jos, confirmed the blockade and vandalism to several cars.
There were no official reports of deaths but Baba Bala, who escaped the violence on the road, said at least six people were killed.
“I was lucky the convoy of the (Plateau) state government was passing through the scene of the attack shortly after I ran into the attackers,” he said.
“I escaped with smashed windscreens and dents on my car. I saw six dead bodies and several damaged cars.”