Creative Thinking : Futuristic babies

Updated 18 January 2013
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Creative Thinking : Futuristic babies

I don’t know if you read a recent article in Arab News titled “Technology world: Crawling into the cradle.” I have, and cannot help commenting upon it.
The article, reporting on the Consumer Electronic Show on the newest technological devices being held in Las Vegas, starts by saying: “One is never too young to be connected.” It goes without saying that they are not referring to the importance of “connection” between parents and children, friends or human beings in general. Here they are talking about technology. So ... if each individual is never too young to surf the net, it is natural to ask, “How young”? The article immediately provides the answer: “.. a variety of apps aimed at the youngest audiences, even those unable to walk.” I already imagine babies, just a few months old, propped up in their “cradle,” with their little computers set in front of them, being busy clicking buttons here and there. No more cute little toys, fluffy plush animals or musical overhead merry-go-rounds. A tiny battery operated computer is ready to provide modern electronic entertainment to babies.
But this is not all. I also wonder — why should this kind of connection be desirable? A few lines below comes the answer: “... accessories and apps marketed to parents as tools to help children learn at a very tender age.” Wow! This is really interesting. Children need to be encouraged to learn at a “very tender age.” Learn “what“? What do a few months old babies need to learn besides imitating mom in uttering their first cute words? What else do they “need” beside mom’s love and caring? I don’t know you, but I am already envisioning a little pitiful army of tiny robot-like babies, sitting in their prams or chairs, unaware of the world around them, all concentrated on “being connected” and learning stuff they absolutely do not need at this stage of their life. But such devices make “it possible for a six-month-old to use a smartphone.” What an achievement! The marketing manager of a worldwide toy company said: “We see moms using such devices to occupy babies all the time.” Double wow! So now mothers, besides being busy with their own jobs and chores, need to keep their babies occupied constantly, even during the little time they could spend with them.
A more advanced option is to give 18-months-olds iPads that will allow them to “start a digital lifestyle.” Finally, a particular gadget is designed for four-to-eight-years-old but, as the manufacturers’ sales representative said, “..kids have the ability to use it at the age of two.” Still in a hurry, right...? Faster! Earlier! Sooner! I wonder if mankind is aware of what all this means. I don’t believe I am backward or antiquated if I feel worried about the world that is being created for the next generation, for the babies who have already been born and who are going to be the society of tomorrow.
The second part of the article, which concerns a different but not less preoccupying topic, reports on a new kind of TV that knows exactly what you are viewing, so “... this new interactivity opens up possibilities for advertisers who will be able to develop more targeted pitches.” A kind of Big Brother that also becomes a big marketer. No more privacy whatsoever. You will be watched, checked out, categorized, labeled so that your new TV screen will serve you all the programs you like and advertisers will show — brainwashing you toward buying — just the stuff you appear to be interested in. You will be, more than ever, an “item” that has a value only for its capacity of purchasing, while your mind will be numbed and you will forget that other choices are available.
Is this a real world, “our” world, or is it science fiction in action?

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Golden Globe Race seek to rescue injured Indian sailor

The Australian Joint Rescue Co-ordination Center is working hard to assess and coordinate all possible options to rescue Abhilas Tomy. (goldengloberace)
Updated 23 September 2018
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Golden Globe Race seek to rescue injured Indian sailor

  • The Australian Joint Rescue Co-ordination Center is working hard to assess and coordinate all possible options to rescue Abhilas Tomy

PARIS: The organizers of the round-the-world Golden Globe Race said Saturday they were scrambling to rescue missing Indian sailor Abhilash Tomy, but admitted he was “as far from help as you can possibly be.”
Tomy’s yacht Thuriya had its mast broken off when it was rolled in a storm on Friday and the yachtsman suffered what he called “a severe back injury.”
The organizers described him as “incapacitated on his bunk inside his boat” and his yacht is 2,000 miles (3,704 kilometers) off the coast of Perth, Western Australia.
On Saturday, he managed to send a message saying: “Extremely difficult to walk, Might need stretcher, can’t walk, thanks safe inside the boat... Sat phone down.”
The organizers said on the race website: “The Australian Joint Rescue Co-ordination Center is working hard to assess and coordinate all possible options to rescue Abhilas Tomy who is as far from help as you can possibly be.”
Tomy, a 39-year-old commander in the Indian navy, is able to communicate using a YB3 texting unit but his primary satellite phone is damaged.
He has a second satellite phone and a handheld VHF radio packed in an emergency bag, but organizers said he was unable to reach it for the moment.
The organizers said they had urged him to try to get to the bag because it could be crucial in making contact with a plane from Australia and an Indian air force plane which might be able to fly over the area.
Given the distance from land, the planes will not be able to spend long in the area, the organizers added.
A French fishing boat was also heading to the scene “but may not arrive for a few days.”
The Golden Globe Race involves a gruelling 30,000-mile solo circumnavigation of the globe in yachts similar to those used in the first race 50 years ago, with no modern technology allowed except the communication equipment.
Tomy’s own yacht is a replica of Robin Knox-Johnston’s Suhail, winner of the first Golden Globe Race.