Crowds celebrate Obama victory at White House

1 / 5
2 / 5
3 / 5
4 / 5
5 / 5
Updated 07 November 2012
0

Crowds celebrate Obama victory at White House

WASHINGTON: Chanting “Four more years!” and “USA, USA!,” a crowd of several thousand well-wishers danced and waved flags outside the White House late Tuesday after Barack Obama was swept back into office.
Crowds braved the chilly autumn weather as they rushed toward the president’s official residence, whooping and crying out “Obama, Obama!,” and giving high-fives to complete strangers.
Union activist Nicole Arow, 28, said she was “thrilled and relieved” to learn about the Democratic incumbent’s victory over Republican rival Mitt Romney, adding: “Joy. That’s what I feel.”
Downtown Washington, usually deserted at midnight on a weekday, was teeming with cars, drivers honking their horns in celebration and waving US flags out the windows.
Obama became only the second Democrat to win a second four-year White House term since World War II.
Those who arrived at the White House shortly after US television networks called the race for Obama appeared to be mainly college students, but the party quickly grew to include middle-aged people and parents with young children.
Hope Cordova, 46, was one of the few who remembered to bring a campaign sign — in her case, a plastic blue-and-white Obama-Biden 2012 yard sign.
“It takes more than four years to turn the country around. We want to give him four more years to complete his job,” said Cordova, 46, a California real estate agent who was visiting a Washington-based friend.
Overcome by enthusiasm, a rowdy group borrowed her sign to wave outside the White House gates. The group jumped in unison as friends took pictures and amateur video with the iconic building in the background. TV reporters filmed the scene, shining bright lights on the group that added to their delirium.
“I’m incredibly excited,” gushed Justin Pinn, a 22-year-old government student at Georgetown University. “I feel that my hope is renewed and I’m ready to fight the good fight. It’s a great day to be an American!” he said.
The outpouring of enthusiasm was reminiscent of the spontaneous celebrations that broke out in Washington immediately after Obama won the 2008 presidential election over Republican Senator John McCain.
Crowds had also gathered outside the White House to celebrate in May 2011 when Obama announced the death of Osama Bin Laden.


Trump-Xi meeting at G20 raises hope for trade truce

Updated 57 min 7 sec ago
0

Trump-Xi meeting at G20 raises hope for trade truce

  • Chinese president said the problems between US and China won’t benefit either sides
  • US and China raised tariffs on some of each other’s goods and companies

WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump and Chinese leader Xi Jinping have agreed to meet at the G20 summit in Japan next week, raising hopes for a truce in the bruising trade war between the world’s top two economies.
The two leaders spoke on the phone on Tuesday, weeks after negotiations broke down when Trump accused Beijing of reneging on its commitments, hiked tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese goods and then blacklisted Chinese telecom giant Huawei.
The US president took a conciliatory approach this time.
“Had a very good telephone conversation with President Xi of China. We will be having an extended meeting next week at the G-20 in Japan,” Trump said on Twitter.
“Our respective teams will begin talks prior to our meeting,” he said ahead of the June 28-29 summit.
Xi noted that bilateral relations had encountered difficulties that were “not in the interest of either side” but he warned that dialogue must be conducted on “an equal footing.”
“China and the US will both gain by cooperating and lose by fighting,” Xi told Trump, according to state media.
Global shares were buoyed by the announcement, with Wall Street rallying on Tuesday and Asian stock markets surging on Wednesday.
The White House readout of the call said the leaders “discussed the importance of leveling the playing field for US farmers, workers, and businesses through a fair and reciprocal economic relationship.”
“I think we have a chance. China wants a deal. They don’t like the tariffs,” Trump told reporters at the White House. “I have a very good relationship with president Xi. We’ll see what happens.”
The White House repeated that the focus of the talks will be to address “structural barriers to trade with China and achieving meaningful reforms that are enforceable and verifiable.”
The United States and China seemed close to an agreement when talks collapsed last month.
Beijing retaliated to Trump’s tariffs and moves against Huawei by increasing custom taxes on $60 billion in US goods, creating its own list of “unreliable” companies and individuals and threatening to ban exports of rare earths to the United States.
Xi told Trump that the two countries must “accommodate each other’s legitimate concerns” and that “China hopes the US side can treat Chinese firms in a fair manner,” according to the official Xinhua news agency.
Trump had requested the call between the two leaders, according to Xinhua.
A week before the G20, Xi will visit North Korea on Thursday and Friday, his first trip there as president.
China is North Korea’s sole major ally, and analysts say Xi could use any leverage Beijing may have in the nuclear standoff between Washington and Pyongyang as a “bargaining chip” in his talks with Trump.
Trump economic adviser Larry Kudlow warned that there are “no guarantees” of any resolution in Osaka, Japan.
“Our position continues to be (that) we want structural changes,” Kudlow told reporters.
“They’ll have a good conversation. The fact that they’re meeting is a good thing.”
In an editorial, the state-run China Daily said Communist Party decision-makers, like White House counter-parts, “want to evade a full-blown trade war.”
“Since neither side appears ready to really slam the door shut on further negotiations, they should refrain from escalating tensions, and engage each other in a more constructive manner,” the daily said.
Global markets are concerned about Trump’s threat to impose more steep tariffs on an additional $300 billion in Chinese imports, which could hurt the already slowing Chinese economy and spread the gloom worldwide.
Trump last week threatened to “immediately” jack up tariffs should Xi fail to show up at the meeting. The United States already has 25 percent duties on more than $250 billion of imports from China.