Customs team visits Motabaqah Lab

Updated 24 December 2012
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Customs team visits Motabaqah Lab

A high-level delegation from the Saudi Customs visited the Riyadh Complex Laboratories of Motabaqah in Riyadh’s second industrial area. The delegation members were Sulaiman Al-Tuwaijri, director general of King Khaled International Airport's Customs, Abdulmohsin Al-Shinaifi, director of documentation department, Abdulkarim Al-Wilae advisor of the assistant director general for customs' affairs and Abdullah Al-Aud, director general of Riyadh dry port's customs, in the presence of Professor Saleh Al-Sedrani, EVP of Motabaqah escorted by managers from the head office and laboratory managers from different regions and sectors.
The visit came under the umbrella of the strategic partnership between Saudi Customs and Motabaqah’s Saudi Specialized Laboratories to protect consumers and markets from products that do not conform with the Saudi and international standards and fake/forged commodities.
Professor Al-Sedrani and his executive team headed and guided the delegation to a tour to its various laboratories as the vehicles' spare parts testing lab, textiles testing lab, building materials lab, calibration and measurements lab, electrical products testing lab and the vehicles testing lab, to preview and showcase the mechanism these laboratories pursue in testing samples in accordance with Saudi and international standards, in a manner that makes the test results and conformity certificates authentic and dependable.
Professor Al-Sedrani expressed his pleasure and gratitude for the significant visit by Saudi Customs officials to Motabaqah’s laboratories in the context of boosting the means of activating the specialized laboratories and converge them with the Customs matrix through the one stop e-system.


Shell, Exxon not to seek compensation for end of Dutch gas field production

Updated 34 min 31 sec ago
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Shell, Exxon not to seek compensation for end of Dutch gas field production

AMSTERDAM: Energy companies Royal Dutch Shell and Exxon Mobil will not submit a claim for missed revenue due to the Dutch government's decision to halt gas production at the Groningen field by 2030, the Dutch ministry of Economic Affairs said on Monday.
"A lot of gas will be left in the ground," Economy minister Eric Wiebes said at the presentation of his deal with the oil majors responsible for extracting Groningen gas.
"That gas is the property of the oil companies, but they will not submit a claim and the government is not required to compensate them."
The Dutch government in March said it would end gas production at the Groningen field by the end of the next decade, in an effort to stop a string of relatively small, but damaging earthquakes caused by gas extraction.
This will leave around 450 billion cubic meters (bcm) of gas in the ground, Wiebes said, with an estimated value of approximately €70 billion ($81.5 billion).
The decision to halt Groningen production forced the government to broker a new deal with Shell and Exxon Mobil, whose 50-50 joint venture NAM is responsible for the field.
NAM will be required to pump as much gas as the government says is needed in the coming years. In return, it will see its share of the revenue from Groningen rise from 10 to 27 percent, Wiebes said, starting this year.
As part of the deal, NAM will also contribute a total of €500 million to strengthen the economy in the Groningen region.