Diplomats all praise for rich Saudi heritage and culture

Updated 14 January 2013
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Diplomats all praise for rich Saudi heritage and culture

US Ambassador to the Kingdom James Smith, along with an accompanying delegation, recently visited the ongoing Exhibition of Salman bin Abdulaziz: Leadership in Architectural Heritage, currently being held at the National Museum at King Abdulaziz Historical Center in Riyadh.
He expressed his admiration of the show, describing it as a window for the Kingdom’s architectural heritage. He said the exhibition enables visitors to witness the Kingdom’s cultural richness and its civilizational depth.
Ambassador Smith said: “What we have seen of civilizational landmarks as reflected by the exhibition’s paintings, and replicas of architectural projects, confirms the continual building of civilization by the Saudi people. At the same time, it clearly demonstrates the intensive efforts of Crown Prince Salman, deputy premier and minister of defense, in the service of heritage.”
He said that the crown prince enjoys deep insight in supporting the national heritage and paying attention to it, and his efforts in this area surpass local and regional arenas, and this is clear in his support of the “Saudi Archaeological Masterpieces exhibition,” which was recently inaugurated by Prince Sultan bin Salman, President of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities (SCTA), in Washington.
The US ambassador described the National Museum as a prominent civilizational landmark in the city of Riyadh, and said its contents confirm the Kingdom’s cultural and civilizational depth. Meanwhile, a delegation of the Chinese Embassy in the Kingdom headed by Chinese Cultural Attaché Lee Wudeh Chan, which recently visited the Prince Sultan exhibition, was also all praise for Saudi Arabia’s architecture and civilization. Chan said the exhibition emphasizes the great diversity and uniqueness of the architectural heritage of the Kingdom, and also reflects the genius of the Saudi people and their skills in the field of architectural heritage.


Mystery Egypt sarcophagus found not to house Alexander the Great’s remains

Mostafa Wazir, Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, inspects the site of the newly discovered giant black sarcophagus in Sidi Gaber district of Alexandria, Egypt July 19, 2018 in this handout photo courtesy of the Ministry of Antiquities. (REUTERS)
Updated 59 min 21 sec ago
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Mystery Egypt sarcophagus found not to house Alexander the Great’s remains

  • The unmarked tomb in Alexandria did not likely belong to any other notable ruler in the Ptolemaic period (332 BC-30 BC) associated with Alexander the Great, or the subsequent Roman era
  • The location of the remains of Alexander the Great, who died in 323 BC in Babylon, remains a mystery

ALEXANDRIA, Egypt: Egyptian archaeologists on Thursday dashed local hopes that a newly discovered ancient sarcophagus might contain the remains of Alexander the Great, finding instead the mummies of what appeared to be a family of three.
Workmen inadvertently unearthed the approximately 2,000-year-old black granite sealed sarcophagus this month during the construction of an apartment building in the historic Mediterranean port city of Alexandria.
The 30-ton coffin is the largest yet found in Alexandria, prompting a swirl of theories in local and international media that it may be the resting place of the ancient Greek ruler who in 331 BC founded the city that still bears his name.
Egypt’s antiquities ministry had vigorously dismissed the chances of finding Alexander’s remains inside the 30-ton sarcophagus and on Thursday its skepticism was vindicated.
“We found the bones of three people, in what looks like a family burial... Unfortunately the mummies inside were not in the best condition and only the bones remain,” Mostafa Waziri, secretary-general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, told reporters at the site.
Waziri said some of the remains had disintegrated because sewage water from a nearby building had leaked into the sarcophagus through a small crack in one of the sides.
The location of the remains of Alexander the Great, who died in 323 BC in Babylon, remains a mystery.
The sarcophagus in Alexandria is the latest of a series of interesting archaeological finds this year in Egypt that include a 4,400-year-old tomb in Giza and an ancient necropolis in Minya, south of Cairo.
The unmarked tomb in Alexandria did not likely belong to any other notable ruler in the Ptolemaic period (332 BC-30 BC) associated with Alexander the Great, or the subsequent Roman era, Waziri said.
The prospect of opening the long-sealed sarcophagus had stirred fears in Egyptian media that it could unleash a 1,000-year curse.
“We’ve opened it and, thank God, the world has not fallen into darkness, said Waziri.
“I was the first to put my whole head inside the sarcophagus... and here I stand before you ... I am fine.”