Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Updated 23 February 2013
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Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

One of the most famous stories ever written is certainly “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” Surprisingly, though, this book is seldom linked to its author, Robert Louis Stevenson, whom everyone knows as the author of the universally acclaimed “Treasure Island.” Nevertheless, he is also the “creator” of the immortal characters of Dr. Jekyll and his evil counterpart, Mr. Hyde.
Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) became a literary celebrity during his lifetime and he is among the most translated authors of all time. He was admired by several other great writers such as Hemingway and Kipling. G.K. Chesterton said that Stevenson “seemed to pick the right word up on the point of his pen.” His frail health prevented him from pursuing a career in engineering – his family profession – and he also had to give up his studies to become a lawyer. He then dedicated himself to writing only. He married an American lady and wrote “Treasure Island” for his stepson. Stevenson endured stressful health problems throughout his entire life, till his death on the isle of Samoa, in the South Pacific, at the age of only forty-four.
This novel was published in 1886 and recounts a story that is strange indeed. A scientist, Dr. Jekyll, creates a potion that, when it is drunk, transforms an individual – from the good, kind person he is – into an ugly, malevolent, wicked semi-human being. Dr. Jekyll is a respected doctor in London society and believes that human beings are made of two different parts: the good one and the bad one. He also believes that the good part is able to control the evil one, and that this is a positive trait that can improve society. During his experiments, he decides to use himself to test such hypothesis and so, when he actually (because of a “wrong” ingredient) discovers a recipe able to operate the transformation, he drinks the potion and changes himself into his evil “twin”, Mr. Hyde. Thus, he starts leading a double life. While he is the good doctor, he has a normal, fruitful existence, with a loving fiancé and faithful friends. At night, though, he runs around London terrorizing people, leading a life of corruption and recurring crime. When he becomes Dr. Jekyll again, he regrets Hyde’s evil doings and tries to make amends. But then… he drinks the potion again. And the vicious circle continues. At a certain point, Dr. Jekyll realizes that the evil side is becoming stronger and stronger, until he is unable to turn back into Dr. Jekyll at will. Such story can only end in tragedy, with the death of the cursed scientist.
This novel is usually interpreted as a description of a split personality (the good one versus the bad one). But, instead of two personalities coexisting in some individuals, I rather think that Stevenson portrayed the two sides of the human personality, which are common to all. The character Dr. Jekyll represents the positive side, the true “humane” nature, i.e. the person one really is: a decent, kind, loving individual. Mr. Hyde portrays the hidden, lowly instincts that are there, inside each of us, but that we try not to let come up to the surface of our “way of being”. Can something be learned from this story? Are these two traits intertwined in such a way that they can never be untied, separated? Is a battle between the two inevitable?


Elsa Franco Al Ghaslan


All eyes on Salah as Egyptians await Champions League final

Updated 27 May 2018
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All eyes on Salah as Egyptians await Champions League final

CAIRO: An owner of a Cairo coffee shop supervised last-minute arrangements for Saturday’s European Champions League final between Real Madrid and Liverpool, giving instructions to his employees as they lined up chairs and set up a bigger television set.
“Today is the big day for us. No match is more important than tonight’s, simply because Mohamed Salah is playing,” Mohamed Fathy, the owner of a cafe located in the affluent district of Maadi in southern Cairo, told Arab News.
Salah has enjoyed a record-breaking debut season with Liverpool and could cap a remarkable campaign by leading the Reds to the most-coveted European title as they face serial winners Real Madrid, who are eyeing a third successive triumph.
Nicknamed the Egyptian King, Salah has racked up a record 32 Premier League goals in a 38-game campaign and netted 10 Champions League goals to help Liverpool reach their first final since losing 2-1 to AC Milan in 2007.
He has become a national hero in Egypt, with his popularity hitting unprecedented heights. Saturday’s Champions League final is given more attention than any fixture for Cairo giants Ahly or Zamalek, who each have a huge fan base in the football-mad country.
“We raised our prices a bit because this is the probably the most important day of the football season. We expect to welcome the same number of people who came to the cafe when Egypt defeated Congo (last October) to reach the World Cup,” Fathy said.
Salah ‘gatherings’
Friends have been making plans for weeks to watch the game, choosing between a plenty of options as Cairo’s cafes and mega-malls gear up for the final.
Cairo Festival City, a mall in the upscale Fifth Settlement district, installed a huge screen for its visitors, creating a stadium-like atmosphere. Vodafone, Egypt’s leading mobile operator, launched a competition and invited customers to watch the match and have the pre-dawn Suhoormeal at Cairo’s upmarket Ritz-Carlton hotel.
Coffee shops in poorer areas also replaced their television sets with larger models, which were placed in the streets in order to accommodate as much people as possible.
Many friends are planning to come together in large gatherings at homes after the Ramadan iftar meal to watch Salah in action, but some have mixed emotions.
Spanish giants Real Madrid, the world’s most successful outfit, are popular in Egypt and favored by millions of Egyptians, who will be equally keen to see Salah lift the Champions League trophy in Kiev.
“I really don’t know who I should support now; my heart is split between Real Madrid, the club I have been supporting since I was child, and Salah who deserves to finish his season by winning such a prestigious title,” said Mahmoud Raheem, a 32-year-old fan.
But Liverpool and Salah still enjoy the unique support of their own fans. The club, England’s most successful in Europe, has an official fan club in Egypt, which includes thousands of supporters.
They plan to watch the game on a huge screen in Cairo’s Nasr City district, hoping Salah could play an instrumental role in giving them a title they have long sought.
“It will be difficult against Real because of their experience, but we still have deadly counter-attacking abilities that could help us a lot. Salah has had a great season and it would be great if he can finish the season by leading us to the trophy,” said Ahmed Maher, a 36-year-old Liverpool fan.
If Salah wins the Champions League, he will only become the second Arab to taste that glory after Algerian great Rabah Madjer, who was on target in Porto’s famous 2-1 comeback win over Bayern Munich in the 1987 European Cup final.