KSA, Finland sign pact on telecoms

Updated 04 November 2014

KSA, Finland sign pact on telecoms

Saudi Arabia and Finland signed a memorandum of understanding here Tuesday in the telecommunications sector.
Krista Kiuru, Finland’s minister of education, science and communications, signed the agreement with Mohamed Jamil bin Ahmed Mulla, minister of communications and information technology at the Saudi ministry’s offices.
“It is a wide ranging agreement in Information and Communication Technology to further enhance bilateral cooperation,” Kiuru said.
This includes broadband, digital media and cyber security. Nokia has already done a great deal in facilitating further cooperation between the two countries, she said.
Kiuru said her visit was “an effort to seek wide-ranging cooperation of mutual interest.” Her priorities are education and communication because Finland is one of the world’s leaders in these sectors.
She said Finland has agreements on education in the Kingdom, with the Technical and Vocational Training Corporation (TVTC) and a kindergarten program.
“We believe in quality education. We would like to make sure that our sources are reliable and ensure vocational training faces up to the challenges of the growing Saudi market.”
Kiuru is accompanied by a huge delegation comprising senior officials and technical experts in education and telecommunications. She said that many countries are seeking to follow the model of the Finnish education system, which is free for citizens, as it is in Saudi Arabia.
The minister visited several institutions of higher learning in Riyadh including King Saud University, the TVTC, King Abdullah Project for Public Education Development (Tatweer) and Princess Nora bint Abdulrahman University, which “impressed” her.
She also met with members of the Shoura Council to discuss further cooperation including a student exchange program.
Kiuru said that Finland has invited the Saudi telecoms minister to Helsinki to bolster cooperation in the field.


White House says Trump regrets not raising tariffs higher

US President Donald Trump arrives at the G7 summit in Biarritz, France, on Sunday. Trump had been trying to use the conference to rally global leaders to do more to stimulate their economies, as fears rise of a potential slowdown in the US ahead of his reelection. (AP)
Updated 26 August 2019

White House says Trump regrets not raising tariffs higher

  • President’s comments appear at first to mark a rare moment of self-reflection by the US leader

TOKYO: President Donald Trump said Sunday that he had second thoughts about escalating the trade war with China, but the White House later reversed that message saying the president was misinterpreted and that his only regret in hiking tariffs is that he didn’t raise them higher. Trump faced a tense reception from world leaders meeting amid mounting anxiety of a global economic slowdown at the Group of Seven summit in France. During a breakfast meeting with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Trump suggested he had qualms about the spiraling conflict. “Yeah. For sure,” Trump told reporters when asked if he has second thoughts about escalating the dispute, adding he has “second thoughts about everything.”
But hours later, White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham issued a statement saying Trump’s comments about US tariffs on China were “greatly misinterpreted.”
She said Trump only responded “in the affirmative — because he regrets not raising the tariffs higher.” The comments appeared at first to mark a rare moment of self-reflection by the famously hard-nosed leader. But the later reversal fit a pattern for Trump in recoiling from statements he believes suggest weakness.

HIGHLIGHTS

• President Donald Trump faced a tense reception from world leaders meeting amid mounting anxiety of a global economic slowdown at the Group of Seven summit in France.

• White House said comments about US tariffs on China were ‘greatly misinterpreted.’

Trump had been trying to use the conference to rally global leaders to do more to stimulate their economies, as fears rise of a potential slowdown in the US ahead of his reelection. Trump’s counterparts, including Johnson, are trying to convince him to back off his trade wars with China and other countries, which they see as contributing to the economic weakening.

US-Japan agreement
Trump and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced on Sunday a deal in principle on a major bilateral trade deal.
“It’s a very big transaction,” Trump said after talks with Abe on the sidelines of the G7 summit.
“Billions and billions of dollars,” he said. “It involves agriculture, it involves e-commerce. It involves many things. We’ve agreed in principle.”

Amazon fires
Also on Sunday, French President Emmanuel Macron said that world leaders at the G7 summit have agreed to help the countries affected by the huge wildfires ravaging the Amazon rainforest as soon as possible.
“We are all agreed on helping those countries which have been hit by the fires as fast as possible,” he told journalists.