Apar Industries to set up transformer oil manufacturing unit at Hamriyah Free Zone

Updated 20 November 2014
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Apar Industries to set up transformer oil manufacturing unit at Hamriyah Free Zone

Singapore-based Petroleum Specialties Pte. Ltd (PSPL), a fully-owned subsidiary of the world renowned Apar Industries Ltd., is tset up a manufacturing unit at Hamriyah Free Zone Authority (HFZA).
The group signed an agreement with Sheikh Khalid bin Abdullah bin Sultan Al-Qasimi, chairman of Hamriyah Free Zone Authority (HFZA), Sharjah Airport International Free Zone (SAIF ZONE) and the Sharjah Sea Ports and Customs Department.
Kushal N. Desai, managing director of Apar Industries represented the Apar Industries Ltd.
Saud Al-Mazrouei, director of HFZA & SAIF ZONE; Sanjay Abhyankar, senior vice president of Apar Industries and project manager for HFZA project; Shirish Patwardhan, executive director, Rchemie International FZC; Sanjit Ghate, director of operations, Rcheme International FZC and other top officials were present at the signing ceremony that took place at SAIF ZONE.
Apar Industries Ltd. is the largest manufacturer of transformer oil, white oils, rubber process oils and lubricants (industrial & automotive) in India. 
The GCC and Africa accounts for a significantly large portion of Apar’s export revenues. 
The group has a $850 million diversified company offering value-added products and services in power transmission conductors, petroleum specialties and power cables.
The group accounts for about 50 percent of the Indian transformer oils market and about 22 percent of its aluminum conductor market. 
 “Our goal to create a robust business environment by meeting the needs and demands of our investors,” Saud Salim Al-Mazrouei said, while welcoming the 4th largest manufacturer of  transformer oils in the world to HFZA.
“We are keen to set up a manufacturing unit at HFZA, which can cater to the African/MENA market and help in expanding our reach to the  CIS countries,” said Kushal Desai, managing director of Apar Industries.
“We will set up this manufacturing facility through our Singapore-based subsidiary Petroleum Specialties Pte Ltd,” he added. 
When asked about the investment, he said: “The project is huge and still on the drawing board. Once detailed engineering is done we will be able to furnish further information about the project cost, working capital, etc.”
Abhyankar said: “HFZA has extended extensive support to us and PSPL has been awarded 30,000 square meters of land in HFZA to develop the facility and we plan to complete the project by December 2015."
He said: "“We are moving to HFZA due to its strategic location and as per the recommendation of our business associates Rchemie International FZC that already has a base in HFZA."
While evaluating their current market presence in the MENA/Africa region, Abhyankar said that Apar Industries Ltd. has decent market and sales in Africa, including MENA, and PSPL has strengthened the business of its customers through proactive product development.
“Currently, Apar Industries, which is listed on the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE), exports specialty oils to more than 70 countries,” Abhyankar said.
Hamriyah Free Zone houses 6,000 companies from across 155 nations, welcoming foreign investment from more than 500 industries in the key sectors of oil and gas, petrochemicals, maritime, steel, construction, and food.


Can a hungry Mali turn rice technology into ‘white gold’?

Updated 20 October 2018
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Can a hungry Mali turn rice technology into ‘white gold’?

  • Malians are cautiously turning to a controversial farming technique to adapt to the effects of climate change
  • Dubbed the System of Rice Intensification (SRI), the new method was pioneered in Madagascar in 1983

BAGUINEDA: When rice farmers started producing yields nine times larger than normal in the Malian desert near the famed town of Timbuktu a decade ago, a passerby could have mistaken the crop for another desert mirage.
Rather, it was the result of an engineering feat that has left experts in this impoverished nation in awe — but one that has yet to spread widely through Mali’s farming community.
“We must redouble efforts to get political leaders on board,” said Djiguiba Kouyaté, a coordinator in Mali for German development agency GIZ.
With hunger a constant menace, Malians are cautiously turning to a controversial farming technique to adapt to the effects of climate change.

 

Dubbed the System of Rice Intensification (SRI), the new method was pioneered in Madagascar in 1983. It involves planting fewer seeds of traditional rice varieties and taking care of them following a strict regime.
Seedlings are transplanted at a very young age and spaced widely. Soil is enriched with organic matter, and must be kept moist, though the system uses less water than traditional rice farming.
Up to 20 million farmers now use SRI in 61 countries, including in nearby Sierra Leone, Senegal and Ivory Coast, said Norman Uphoff, of the SRI International Network and Resources Center at Cornell University in the US.
But, despite its success, the technique has been embraced with varying degrees of enthusiasm. Uphoff said that is because it competes with the improved hybrid and inbred rice varieties that agricultural corporations sell.
For Faliry Boly, who heads a rice-growing association, the prospect of rice becoming a “white gold” for Mali should spur on authorities and farmers to adopt rice intensification.
The method could increase yields while also offering a more environmentally-friendly alternative, including by replacing chemical fertilizers with organic ones, he said.
He also pointed out that rice intensification naturally lends itself to Mali’s largely arid climate.

FACTOID

Up to 20 million farmers now use rice intensification in 61 countries, including in nearby Sierra Leone, Senegal and Ivory Coast.