Hamriyah Free Zone to install air quality monitoring stations

Updated 22 November 2014
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Hamriyah Free Zone to install air quality monitoring stations

Hamriyah Free Zone Authority (HFZA) has decided to install continuous and portable ambient air quality monitoring stations in the Free Zone to monitor the levels of air pollution at all times.
Saud Salim Al Mazrouei, director of Hamriyah Free Zone Authority (HFZA) and Sharjah Airport International Free Zone (SAIF ZONE), signed a contract in this regard with BDH Middle East L.L.C which was represented by its Business Development Director, Noveel Pandya.
“This initiative is in line with the directives of Dr. Sheikh Sultan bin Mohammed Al-Qasimi, member of the Supreme Council, Ruler of Sharjah,” said Al-Mazrouei.
He thanked the Ruler for his constant support toward environmental conservation and industrial growth in accordance with the standards.
“We are installing this system to assess the extent of pollution, to evaluate our control options and provide data for air quality modeling,” he added.
“These ambient air quality monitoring networks are designed to address environmental & human health objectives and we are committed toward preserving the environment and have established high performance standards for environment, health and safety (EHS) in the free zone as a step toward our objectives,” Al-Mazrouei said.
“We have assigned BDH Middle East for the supplying & commissioning of Ecotech, Australia and Airpointer, Austrian brands of Ambient Air Quality Monitoring stations as a part of this project which is on par with the international and federal environmental standards,” he said.
“We are upgrading our systems with the launch of this ambient air quality monitoring system,” he added.
“Apart from leading to heightened awareness of the importance of EHS across our operations, the new air quality monitoring system — to be managed by the internal environmental protection department — will also help in identifying and managing risk or breach of norms by companies operating in the Free Zone,” he said.
“Ambient Air Quality Monitoring will help to determine the daily trend of air pollutants and to assess the free zone’s compliance with the air quality standards. It will also assist in evaluating the potential impact of the air pollutants on the environment and on the health of the free zone population and the general public. In addition, reliable and updated information on air pollution will be available to the general public,” Al-Mazrouei said.
“Our environmental team keeps a close watch on air quality at different sites within the Hamriyah Free Zone and the priority monitoring is focused on the industrial and other sensitive areas,” he added.


Companies in Oman need government permission before hiring expats

Updated 09 December 2018
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Companies in Oman need government permission before hiring expats

  • A new traffic light-themed online system is currently being rolled out in Oman, in which companies’ Omanization quotas are being monitored
  • “The new system focuses on enhancing Omanization rates in the private establishments”

DUBAI: Oman-based companies will have to secure the Ministry of Manpower’s go ahead before they can hire expats, local daily Times of Oman reported this week.
A new traffic light-themed online system is currently being rolled out in Oman, in which companies’ Omanization quotas are being monitored.
Under this new system, companies that meet Omanization standards set by the government will receive a green signal online, allowing them to proceed with hiring expat employees.
Companies with unclear Omanization policies will be given a yellow signal, while companies that fall short of meeting their quotas will receive a red signal, barring them from moving forward with hiring expat employees.
“The new system focuses on enhancing Omanization rates in the private establishments,” said a ministry spokesperson.
The step taken by the government is part of the Omanization drive to recruit more of its citizens in private companies, a similar push is underway across the GCC where countries like Saudi Arabia and Kuwait have also been trying to increase the number of nationals in private sector employment.

Earlier this year, expat workers in the country faced a six-month visa ban across 87 industries, including media, engineering, marketing and sales, accounting and finance, IT, insurance, technicians, administration and HR.