Ministry of Agriculture to promote sea food consumption

Updated 05 December 2014
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Ministry of Agriculture to promote sea food consumption

The Ministry of Agriculture has stepped up efforts to halt the decline in seafood consumption and to boost fish production, which will go a long way in ensuring food security on national and regional levels. The ministry has also announced an ambitious target to produce one million tons of fish annually within a few years from now.
Ahmed bin Saleh Al-Aiadh, general director of aquaculture department at the Ministry of Agriculture, said here Wednesday that "the per capita consumption of fish and fish products stands at 9 to 10 kilograms annually in Saudi Arabia compared to about 62 kgs in Japan." He said: "We are also much below the global average in terms of consumption.”
Al-Aiadh was speaking at a press briefing after formally inaugurating the “Sea Food Festival” here at the Lulu Hypermarket. The inaugural event was attended by a large number of guests and top Lulu executives including Abdul Saleem, Lulu's regional manager; Shafeek Rahman, commercial manager; and Bashar Naser Al-Bashar, chief of administration.
Asked about move to promote sea food consumption in Saudi Arabia, Al-Aiadh said that "it’s a shared responsibility." He called on the private sector, the health professionals, the nutritionists and the media to join hands to generate awareness about the benefits of fish and fish products. He also called on them for reversing the decline in fish consumption among the younger generation.
He pointed out that the Saudi government has licensed several aquaculture farms in the Kingdom. To this end, it must be noted that the Ministry of Agriculture has already invested an additional $10.6 billion into aquaculture projects to produce one million tons of fish in the next 16 years.
Speaking at the press briefing, Abdul Saleem, Lulu regional manager, said that a variety of sea food including fish biryani, grilled sea food and fish sandwiches are also on sale. He pointed out that this is the fourth consecutive year for Lulu to hold the sea food festival in Saudi Arabia. The five-day long festival has been organized by all the Lulu Hypermarkets across the Kingdom.
Besides showcasing more than 100 varieties of fish including live fish for sale on this occasion, Lulu Hypermarkets across the Kingdom have organized colorful activities for kids and families on this occasion. A cooking contest has also been organized on the sidelines of the festival. "A variety of sea food including fish biryani, grilled sea food and fish sandwiches are also on sale," added Saleem.
He said that the festival is unique in the sense that it features some of the rare fish species imported from different corners of the world. They include Norwegian salmon, Egyptian tilapia, crabs, live lobsters, shrimps, oyster, cod fillet, and Canadian lobster.


Airbus says it will obey WTO ruling on aircraft subsidies

Updated 35 min 39 sec ago
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Airbus says it will obey WTO ruling on aircraft subsidies

PARIS: Airbus plans to set out measures that will bring it into line with a World Trade Organization ruling on subsidies for its A350 and A380 jets, a senior lawyer said on Tuesday.
The move comes after the US won the right to seek sanctions against EU goods following a partial victory in its 14-year legal battle against European government support for Airbus at the World Trade Organization.
The EU says it expects to strike a similar legal blow in a parallel case on US support for Boeing later this year.
“We will be announcing this morning a complete package of measures to fully comply with last week’s ruling, putting us basically at a point where we have nothing left to answer and no sanctions possible,” Karl Hennessee, senior vice president and head of litigation at Airbus, told BBC radio’s Today program.
The subsidies row coincides with transatlantic tensions over US aluminum and steel tariffs, and the impact on European firms from Washington’s decision to exit an Iran nuclear pact.
It is also part of a two-way battle between the EU and the US over aircraft subsidies that could spark tit-for-tat reprisals between the two trade superpowers.
In a rare public face-off between senior strategists in the dispute, Boeing’s chief external lawyer in the case told the same BBC program that the US would be free to target any European products, not just aerospace.
“The WTO will decide what the proper number is and ... give the US that authority,” Robert Novick, co-managing partner at US law firm WilmerHale, told the BBC Today program.
“In parallel, the US will develop a list of products on which it might consider imposing countermeasures,” he added.
The transatlantic dispute stems from mutual claims that the world’s two largest planemakers benefited from illegal subsidies in the form of subsidized government loans to Airbus and research grants or tax breaks to Boeing.
Underscoring the cost and complexity of the case, the two sides have been arguing since 2011 about whether they complied with earlier rulings.
Airbus did not say how it would comply with the final ruling on European aid but a European Commission document said it would repay an A350 loan to the UK government this year and reduce the drawdown of other loans.
It also said the bankruptcy of Russian carrier Transaero, resulting in fewer A380 deliveries, had helped it to comply, while other aid been blunted by the passage of time — an argument that has previously been rejected by the US.
Hennessee also called for a settlement similar to one between Canada and Brazil that set the tone for global plane financing.