Libya seeks cut in OPEC production

Updated 08 April 2015
0

Libya seeks cut in OPEC production

LONDON: OPEC should change course and cut oil supply by 800,000 barrels per day (bpd) or more to prevent an expected return of Iranian exports from weighing on prices, Libya’s OPEC governor said.
The comments underline how the halving of oil prices from $115 a barrel in June on global oversupply is hurting OPEC’s less wealthy members outside the Gulf and suggests the 12-nation group remains divided over the impact of its 2014 policy shift to defend market share, not prices.
“OPEC members, as a unit, need to re-evaluate their strategies,” Samir Kamal, Libya’s OPEC governor and head of planning at the North African country’s oil ministry, told Reuters by e-mail.
They “need to reach an agreement to bring down the production levels by at least 800,000 barrels a day, especially now that an agreement has been reached with Iran which is expected to increase its production,” he said.
A framework deal announced last week to curb Iran’s nuclear work could eventually allow Tehran to boost oil exports, which have been cut by almost half since 2012 due to Western sanctions.
Libya is struggling with two rival governments. Kamal represents Libya on OPEC’s board of governors, a body that influences but does not decide OPEC policy.
When the producer group last met in November, Libya was among member countries calling for a cut in production.
OPEC meets again on June 5 to set policy. Although they did not oppose the group’s no-cut decision of last year, other non-Gulf OPEC members such as Venezuela and Iran have expressed misgivings about it and sought supply reductions.
A group of 18 African oil producers — many of which are not OPEC members — is lobbying for output curbs to boost prices that it says have fallen to levels that threaten to spark social unrest.


Mideast plays key role in Chinese export of armed drones, report says

Updated 17 December 2018
0

Mideast plays key role in Chinese export of armed drones, report says

  • China has exploited America’s selective drone export policy to become an increasingly influential player in meeting demand
  • The report is entitled “Armed Drones in the Middle East: Proliferation and Norms in the Region”

BEIRUT: The use of armed drones in the Middle East, driven largely by sales from China, has grown significantly in the past few years with an increasing number of countries and other parties using them in regional conflicts to lethal effects, a new report said Monday.
The report by the Royal United Services Institute, or RUSI, found that more and more Mideast countries have acquired armed drones, either by importing them, such as Jordan, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, or by building them domestically like Israel, Iran and Turkey.
China has won sales in the Middle East and elsewhere by offering drones — otherwise known as UAVs or unmanned aerial vehicles — at lower prices and without the political conditions attached by the United States.
The report , entitled “Armed Drones in the Middle East: Proliferation and Norms in the Region,” said that by capitalizing on the gap in the market over the past few years, Beijing has supplied armed drones to several countries that are not authorized to purchase them from the US, and at a dramatically cheaper price.
“China, a no-questions-asked exporter of drones, has played and is likely to continue playing a key role as a supplier of armed UAVs to the Middle East,” it said.
The report explored where and how each of the states have used their armed drones and whether they have changed the way these countries approach air power. It found that Iran, the UAE and Turkey all changed the way they employ airpower after they acquired armed drones.
For Turkey and the UAE, armed drones enabled them to conduct strikes in situations where they would not have risked using conventional aircraft, it said. Iran developed armed drones from the outset specifically to enable to project power beyond the reach of its air force, which is hamstrung by obsolete aircraft and sanctions, the report added.
The report said it remains to be seen whether and how the loosening of restrictions on the exportation of armed drones by the Trump administration will alter dynamics in the region.
“Nonetheless, proliferation in armed UAVs in the Middle East is unlikely to stop and could, in fact, even accelerate,” the report said.