Alkhabeer Capital targets Islamic endowment business

Updated 11 May 2015

Alkhabeer Capital targets Islamic endowment business

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia-based Alkhabeer Capital said on Monday it had launched an advisory service for structuring and managing the assets of the Islamic charitable foundations known as awqaf.
Alkhabeer, an Islamic investment and advisory firm, becomes one of only a few private sector firms globally to focus on awqaf assets.
The foundations are believed to control tens of billions of dollars worth of assets around the world; Muslims use them to contribute a portion of their wealth, in cash or other forms, to charitable projects such as mosques and schools.
In many cases their management has remained ultra-conservative, unsophisticated or inefficient, meaning they earn low returns on their assets. So in the last few years there have been efforts across Muslim-majority countries to modernize the management of awqaf.
Alkhabeer will target educational institutions, family offices and wealthy individuals that want to establish awqaf, offering the services of asset managers, the firm said in a statement.
The firm was founded in 2004 initially focusing on real estate and private equity transactions, but is now actively developing its capital markets business.
In 2013, Dubai's Noor Investment Group and the Awqaf and Minors Affairs Foundation, a Dubai government body which runs endowments, launched an advisory firm specialising in managing awqaf assets. Regulators in Egypt and Malaysia have also moved to modernise the sector.


Africa development bank says risks to continent’s growth ‘increasing by the day’

Updated 18 August 2019

Africa development bank says risks to continent’s growth ‘increasing by the day’

  • The trade dispute between US and China has roiled global markets and unnerved investors
  • African nations need to boost trade with each other to cushion the impact of external shocks

DAR ES SALAAM: The US-China trade war and uncertainty over Brexit pose risks to Africa’s economic prospects that are “increasing by the day,” the head of the African Development Bank (AfDB) told Reuters.
The trade dispute between the world’s two largest economies has roiled global markets and unnerved investors as it stretches into its second year with no end in sight.
Britain, meanwhile, appears to be on course to leave the European Union on Oct. 31 without a transition deal, which economists fear could severely disrupt trade flows.
Akinwumi Adesina, president of the AfDB, said the bank could review its economic growth projection for Africa — of 4 percent in 2019 and 4.1 percent in 2020 — if global external shocks accelerate.
“We normally revise this depending on global external shocks that could slowdown global growth and these issues are increasing by the day,” Adesina told Reuters late on Saturday on the sidelines of the Southern African Development Community meeting in Tanzania’s commercial capital Dar es Salaam.
“You have Brexit, you also have the recent challenges between Pakistan and India that have flared off there, plus you have the trade war between the United States and China. All these things can combine to slow global growth, with implications for African countries.”
The bank chief said African nations need to boost trade with each other and add value to agricultural produce to cushion the impact of external shocks.
“I think the trade war has significantly impacted economic growth prospects in China and therefore import demand from China has fallen significantly and so demand for products and raw materials from Africa will only fall even further,” he said.
“It will also have another effect with regard to China’s own outward-bound investments on the continent,” he added, saying these could also affect official development assistance.
Adesina said a continental free-trade zone launched last month, the African Continental Free Trade Area, could help speed up economic growth and development, but African nations needed to remove non-tariff barriers to boost trade.
“The countries that have always been facing lower volatilities have always been the ones that do a lot more in terms of regional trade and do not rely on exports of raw materials,” Adesina said.
“The challenges cannot be solved unless all the barriers come down. Free mobility of labor, free mobility of capital and free mobility of people.”