Telecom roaming charges: Gulf govts agree on gradual reduction

Updated 09 June 2015
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Telecom roaming charges: Gulf govts agree on gradual reduction

DUBAI: Governments of the six Gulf Cooperation Council countries have agreed to gradually reduce roaming charges when making calls, sending text messages and using data within the six-nation bloc, according to a statement carried by state media.
Cuts to fees on calls and text messages would be introduced from April 1, 2016, and would take place over three years, while data charges would be trimmed from the same date but over a five-year period.
The decision was announced following the GCC Ministerial Committee for Post, Telecommunications and Information Technology meeting in Doha and was aimed at promoting tourism in the region, according to the United Arab Emirates' WAM news agency.
The statement did not disclose by how much the charges would be reduced.
The GCC consists of Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, Saudi Arabia and the UAE.
A number of telecom firms operate across multiple GCC geographies. Saudi Telecom, the region's largest firm by market value, has stakes in businesses in Bahrain and Kuwait, with Kuwait's Zain also operating across the same three countries. Qatar's Ooredoo has operations in Kuwait and Oman.


Paris Air Show: After Boeing showstopper, Airbus seeks order bounce

Updated 19 June 2019
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Paris Air Show: After Boeing showstopper, Airbus seeks order bounce

  • British Airways owner IAG signs letter of intent to buy 200 of its 737 MAX jets
  • Airbus is looking for up to 200 orders for the A321XLR, which is designed to open up new routes

PARIS: Airbus, reeling from the potential loss of a major customer for its best-selling A320neo as British Airways owner IAG placed a lifeline order for the grounded 737 MAX, prepared to hit back with more orders for its A321XLR on Wednesday.
The planemaker has been negotiating with US airlines investor Bill Franke whose Indigo Partners has also been known to place orders for multiple airlines within its portfolio and could reel it in for the Paris Air Show, industry sources said.
Airbus declined to comment.
After weathering intense scrutiny over safety and its public image, Boeing won a vote of confidence on Tuesday as IAG signed a letter of intent to buy 200 of its 737 MAX jets that have been grounded since March after two deadly crashes.
The surprise order lifted the energy of a previously subdued Paris Airshow, where the talk had been of the possible end of the aerospace cycle, given the issues at both Boeing and Airbus as well as geopolitical and trade tensions around the world.
Australia’s Qantas Airways said on Tuesday it would order 10 Airbus new A321XLR jets and convert a further 26 from existing orders already on the Airbus books.
Airbus is also in talks with leasing company GECAS and has been trying to secure an eye-catching order for the A321XLR from American Airlines, though the world’s largest carrier does not typically make announcements at air shows.
Airbus is looking for up to 200 orders for the A321XLR, which is designed to open up new routes.