Red Sea Mall wins 2 CMO Asia awards for marketing excellence

Updated 17 October 2015
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Red Sea Mall wins 2 CMO Asia awards for marketing excellence

Jeddah’s Red Sea Mall continued its international winning streak with two CMO Asia awards for marketing excellence.
At the annual ceremony held in Dubai, Red Sea Mall was named winner of the most popular shopping center award for 2015, as well as the CSR best practices award.
Mohammed Alawi, CEO of Red Sea Markets Co., owner of RSM, expressed his pride of the new achievements, saying that these two latest awards highlight the mall’s achievements.
“These awards solidify the leading status the mall has achieved in the Kingdom’s and the region’s entertainment and marketing industries,” he said.
“They prove that the sincere hard work that the mall’s team continues to put in to offer the best possible shopping experience, and to provide the widest possible array of nationally and internationally renowned brands, and as much entertainment and fun each and every member of the family needs, has finally come to fruition,” he added.
“The mall’s vast space allows us to provide the largest number of fashion, beauty, furniture, electronics, and other shops, which meet the different tastes of our visitors. Add to that a world-class entertainment area, a dining area with a varied selection of gourmet food, a branch for the Passport Department, and machines to issue boarding passes for Saudi Arabian Airlines passengers and “you have a shopping center that is far ahead of any other mall throughout the Gulf region.”
CMO Asia’s committee uses an evaluation process with strict standards.
In addition to its leadership in marketing and entertainment, the mall always offers various activities. Its management is committed to contributing to sustained development in the Kingdom and instilling the spirit of national pride among young Saudis. The mall offers a huge number of various global brands and nonstop activities all year round.


US poised to end waivers for 5 countries importing Iranian oil

Updated 22 April 2019
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US poised to end waivers for 5 countries importing Iranian oil

  • Japan, South Korea, Turkey, China and India were exempted from sanctions until May 2
  • Since November, Italy, Greece and Taiwan have stopped importing oil from Iran

WASHINGTON: The Trump administration is poised to tell five nations, including allies Japan, South Korea and Turkey, that they will no longer be exempt from US sanctions if they continue to import oil from Iran, officials said Sunday.
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo plans to announce on Monday that the administration will not renew sanctions waivers for the five countries when they expire on May 2, three US officials said. The others are China and India.
It was not immediately clear if any of the five would be given additional time to wind down their purchases or if they would be subject to US sanctions on May 3 if they do not immediately halt imports of Iranian oil.
The officials were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity ahead of Pompeo’s announcement.
The decision not to extend the waivers, which was first reported by The Washington Post, was finalized on Friday by President Donald Trump, according to the officials. They said it is intended to further ramp up pressure on Iran by strangling the revenue it gets from oil exports.
The administration granted eight oil sanctions waivers when it re-imposed sanctions on Iran after Trump pulled the US out of the landmark 2015 nuclear deal. They were granted in part to give those countries more time to find alternate energy sources but also to prevent a shock to global oil markets from the sudden removal of Iranian crude.
US officials now say they do not expect any significant reduction in the supply of oil given production increases by other countries, including the US itself and Saudi Arabia.
Since November, three of the eight — Italy, Greece and Taiwan — have stopped importing oil from Iran. The other five, however, have not, and have lobbied for their waivers to be extended.
NATO ally Turkey has made perhaps the most public case for an extension, with senior officials telling their US counterparts that Iranian oil is critical to meeting their country’s energy needs. They have also made the case that as a neighbor of Iran, Turkey cannot be expected to completely close its economy to Iranian goods.