Oil market will take time to stabilize, says Al-Naimi

Updated 18 January 2016
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Oil market will take time to stabilize, says Al-Naimi

RIYADH: Minister of Petroleum and Mineral Resources Ali Al-Naimi said on Sunday it would take “some time” to restore stability to the global oil market in the midst of a glut, but he remained optimistic about the future.
Al-Naimi's comments come at a time when OPEC member Iran is preparing to raise oil exports after international sanctions were lifted on Saturday. Brent plunged to $28.94 a barrel on Friday, its lowest in 12 years, on the prospect of additional Iranian barrels.
“As you know, the oil market has witnessed over its long history, periods of instability, severe price fluctuations and petro-economic cycles,” Al-Naimi said in a speech at an energy event in Riyadh attended by the Mexican president and energy minister.
“This is one of them. Market forces as well as the cooperation among the producing nations always lead to the restoration of stability. This, however, takes some time,” he said.
“I am optimistic about the future, the return of stability to the global oil markets, the improvement of prices and the cooperation among the major producing countries,” he added.
Al-Naimi made a reference to the Asian financial crisis of 1998-1999 when oil crashed and Riyadh helped organize a production cut with other non-OPEC producers, including Mexico, to support prices, according to Reuters.


US trade negotiators to visit China for fresh round of talks

Updated 21 March 2019
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US trade negotiators to visit China for fresh round of talks

  • Washington and Beijing are battling over the final shape of a trade deal
  • American officials are demanding profound changes to Chinese industrial policy

BEIJING: US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin will visit China on March 28-29 for a fresh round of talks aimed at resolving the bruising trade war, the Chinese commerce ministry said Thursday.
After their visit, Chinese Vice Premier Liu He will head to the United States in April to continue the negotiations, ministry spokesman Gao Feng said at a press briefing.
Washington and Beijing are battling over the final shape of a trade deal, with American officials demanding profound changes to Chinese industrial policy.
President Donald Trump warned Wednesday that US tariffs on Chinese imports could remain in place for a “substantial period,” dampening hopes that an agreement would see them lifted soon.
Over the last eight months, the United States and China have slapped tariffs on more than $360 billion in two-way goods trade, weighing on the manufacturing sectors in both countries.
On Friday, China’s rubber-stamp parliament approved a foreign investment law to strengthen protections for intellectual property — a central US grievance — but critics said the bill was rammed through without sufficient time for input from businesses.