SBIE 2016 features over 200 exhibitors

Updated 11 April 2016
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SBIE 2016 features over 200 exhibitors

JEDDAH: National and international companies are exhibiting their latest products and services at the 25th Saudi Building & Interiors Exhibition (SBIE), which was opened by Jeddah Mayor Hani Abu Ras on Monday.
The silver jubilee event of the show is being held at the Jeddah Center for Forums and Events, with the support of Jeddah Gov. Prince Mishaal bin Majed.
The mayor said: “This exhibition is an important opportunity to meet the growing demand of products and services in the Kingdom’s construction and real estate sector.”
More than 200 companies are exhibiting at the show, with pavilions from China, Egypt and Turkey, and individual companies notably from Arab world, the rest of Asia and Europe.
The four-day exhibition, which ends on April 14, has been organized by Al-Harithy Company for Exhibitions (ACE). It has wide ranging exhibits related to the construction industry, notably the latest technology and materials as well as approaches to interior design decor and furniture.
“The key objective of the exhibition is to display the latest in technology in building and decoration, and also create an ideal platform for local buyers, and regional and worldwide suppliers to come together and do business,” Zahoor Siddique, ACE’s VP, said.
“In a fluid and dynamic market, SBIE helps manufacturers and suppliers track potential buyers. Our trade visitors will also be able to establish new businesses and representations, and outsource their project requirements,” he added.


German industry groups warn US on tariffs before Trump-Juncker meeting

Updated 22 July 2018
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German industry groups warn US on tariffs before Trump-Juncker meeting

  • Washington imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from the EU, Canada and Mexico on June 1
  • Trump is threatening to extend them to EU cars and car parts

BERLIN: German industry groups warned on Sunday, before European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker meets US President Donald Trump this week, that tariffs the United States has imposed or is threatening to introduce risk harming America itself.
Citing national security grounds, Washington imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from the EU, Canada and Mexico on June 1 and Trump is threatening to extend them to EU cars and car parts. Juncker will discuss trade with Trump at a meeting on Wednesday.
“The tariffs under the guise of national security should be abolished,” Dieter Kempf, head of Germany’s BDI industry association said. Juncker should tell Trump that the United States would harm itself with tariffs on cars and car parts, he told Welt am Sonntag newspaper.
The German auto industry employed more than 118,000 people in the United States and 60 percent of what they produced was exported. “Europe should not let itself be blackmailed and should put in a confident appearance in the United States,” he added.
German Economy Minister Peter Altmaier told Deutschlandfunk radio on Sunday he hoped it was still possible to find a solution that was attractive to both sides. “For us, that means we stand by open markets and low tariffs,” he said
He said the possibility of US tariffs on EU cars was very serious and stressed that reductions in international tariffs in the last 40 years and the opening of markets had resulted in major benefits for citizens.
EU officials have tried to lower expectations about what Juncker can achieve, and played down suggestions that he will arrive in Washington with a novel plan to restore good relations.
Altmaier said it was difficult to estimate the impact of any US car tariffs on the German economy, but added: “Tariffs on aluminum and steel had a volume of just over six billion euros. In this case we would be talking about almost ten times that.”
He said he hoped job losses could be avoided but noted that trade between Europe and the United States made up around one third of total global trade.
“You can imagine that if we go down with a cold in the German-American or European-American relationship, many others around us will get pneumonia so it’s highly risky and that’s why we need to end this conflict as quickly as possible.”
Eric Schweitzer, president of the DIHK Chambers of Commerce, told Welt am Sonntag the German economy had for decades counted on open markets and a reliable global trading system but added: “Every day German companies feel the transatlantic rift getting wider.”