Facebook moms keep tabs on children

Updated 20 February 2013
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Facebook moms keep tabs on children

A study conducted by an online education database shows that an increasing number of mothers are joining Facebook not because they are looking for old friends but they want to know what their children are up to.
From 2010 to 2012, the percentage of mothers' accounts in the US on Facebook jumped from 50 percent to 72 percent.
The study showed that 92 percent of parents using social media networks are “friends” with their children. More than one-third of them look at their kids' profiles everyday.
One in 3 teens on Facebook are embarrassed by their parent's comments and that they would “unfriend” them if they could.
“Even the least modern of parents are now getting hip to the world of Facebook,” says the database in the introduction of the study.
The study claims that more parents are signing up and creating social media profiles. The study added that there's a good chance that parents could embarrass their children in front of their friends on Facebook. “Even if your parents don't write directly on your Facebook wall, you might be surprised at how often they take a peek at your profile just to make sure you're staying out of trouble,” the study said.
“Love it or hate it, your parents are probably on Facebook to stay, but before you click “accept” on their friend requests, make sure you're prepared to have mom and dad regularly viewing your profile,” the study said.


Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

Updated 17 April 2018
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Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

  • Previous research has shown a new blood test has potential to detect eight different kinds of tumors before they spread
  • The research starts in April and will run until September

TOKYO: A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.
Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.
It will now begin testing the method using some 250 urine samples, to see if samples at room temperature are suitable for analysis, Hitachi spokesman Chiharu Odaira told AFP.
“If this method is put to practical use, it will be a lot easier for people to get a cancer test, as there will be no need to go to a medical organization for a blood test,” he said.
It is also intended to be used to detect paediatric cancers.
“That will be especially beneficial in testing for small children” who are often afraid of needles, added Odaira.
Research published earlier this year demonstrated that a new blood test has shown promise toward detecting eight different kinds of tumors before they spread elsewhere in the body.
Usual diagnostic methods for breast cancer consist of a mammogram followed by a biopsy if a risk is detected.
For colon cancer, screening is generally conducted via a stool test and a colonoscopy for patients at high risk.
The Hitachi technology centers around detecting waste materials inside urine samples that act as a “biomarker” — a naturally occurring substance by which a particular disease can be identified, the company said in a statement.
The procedure aims to improve the early detection of cancer, saving lives and reducing the medical and social cost to the country, Odaira explained.
The experiment will start this month until through September in cooperation with Nagoya University in central Japan.
“We aim to put the technology in use in the 2020s, although this depends on various things such as getting approval from the authorities,” Odaira said.