Fahad, Turki win SGBS Texas Scramble tourney

1 / 2
2 / 2
Updated 23 January 2013
0

Fahad, Turki win SGBS Texas Scramble tourney

SGBS (Saudi Golf Business Society) held back-to-back tournaments to close 2012 at Dirab Golf & Country Club and ring in the new year recently.
Winning the two-ball Texas Scramble format competition that followed the stroke play event after a gap of two weeks was the pair of Fahad Almansour, vice president of SGBS, and young Saudi golfer Turki Hussain.
Almansour and Hussain, with a team handicap of 3, posted a net score of 65 to win the tournament that attracted 20 teams and 40 golfers.
Almansour carried the team to victory by holing four birdies, three of them on the back nine. For his part, Hussain had two birdies and two bogeys in the team’s 34-34 round.
Turki’s brother Adullah partnered with Filipino Danny Naval to win second place on countback from Lee William and his junior partner Jal Han Kim after both sides finished on 68. Abdullah and Naval played off 5 handicap and William-Hall off 6.
James Wilkinson and Tariq Khan and the tandem of Jose Vigil and Mike Jones actually also managed 68s to claim the fourth and fifth positions respectively.
Wilkinson was the winner of the longest drive award while Turki claimed the nearest to pin plum.
SGBS President Abdullah Al-Masoud handed over prizes to the winners during the prize distribution ceremony.
Formed in March last year, SGBS aims to promote golf among youngsters in Saudi Arabia, support charity projects and build business links through golf.
As the year drew to a close, SGBS organized a Thursday afternoon stroke play tournament that attracted 40 players.
The Best Gross and Best Net winners were the father-and-son tandem of M. S. Kim and Jan Hal Kim, who shot 74 and 71 respectively.
Almansour and his younger brother Abdulrahman finished second and third in Best Gross category on 73 and 79.
Shahid Rabani and Juan Rosado rounded out the first three Best Net winners on countback after both players returned 74.
The longest drive award went to Rusty Dagget and the closest to pin accolade to taekwondo master Kim.


Match-fixing in tennis is rife, warns report

Updated 4 min 13 sec ago
0

Match-fixing in tennis is rife, warns report

LONDON: A “tsunami” of match-fixing is plaguing non-elite tennis, according to a report released Wednesday by a review panel set up to look into allegations of corruption in the sport.
The Independent Review of Integrity in Tennis report said the lower levels of the sport provide a “fertile breeding ground” for breaches of integrity and are engulfed in betting-related corruption.
The problems stem from too many players in the lower reaches, such as the Futures and Challenger circuits, not earning enough to make a living, coupled with the rise of online betting.
“Player-incentive structure and remuneration creates a lamentably fertile breeding ground for breaches of integrity,” said lawyer Adam Lewis, who chaired the Independent Review Panel (IRP).
“In particular only those playing principally at Tour level make a decent living. Only the top 250 female players and the top 350 men players break even before coaching costs, yet there are around 15,000 professional players.”
The IRP was set up in January 2016 following allegations made by the BBC and Buzzfeed that leading players, including Grand Slam winners, were involved in suspected match-fixing and that evidence had been suppressed.
Having surveyed more than 3,000 players as well as tournament organizers, officials and betting operators, it found “evidence of some issues” at Grand Slams and Tour events, although it did not uncover evidence of a widespread problem at those higher levels.
A total of 14.5 percent of players who responded to the survey said they had first-hand knowledge of match-fixing but the panel found no evidence of top-level players being implicated in corruption.
“Detection is difficult, not least because at many lower-level matches there are no spectators and inadequate facilities to protect players from potential corrupters,” the report said.
“Moreover, under-performance is often attributed to ‘tanking’, which too often has been tolerated.”
The level of suspicious betting alerts rose sharply after the sale of official live scoring data to betting companies in 2012, making tens of thousands of matches available to gamble on.
“The imbalance between prize money and costs, and deliberate under-performance, are the seeds for corruption,” said Lewis.
“It is a small step for a player who already intends to lose for other reasons, to bet or to make others aware of their intentions. It’s a small step to deliberately lose, or lose a game or a set, so as to make enough money to continue playing.
“According to experts, since 2015 tennis has been responsible for more suspicious betting than any other sport.”
The review did not find evidence of a cover-up by either the Tennis Integrity Unit or the International Tennis Federation and the Association of Tennis Professionals — a finding welcomed by the governing bodies.
However, some of the actions taken by the ITF and ATP were seen to be “inappropriate and ineffective.”
The panel recommended restructuring of the professional game with a significant reduction in tournaments deemed “professional,” discontinuing the sale of official live scoring data at lower-level tennis and eliminating betting sponsorship in the sport.
A joint ATP, ITF, Women’s Tennis Association and Grand Slam Board statement read: “Following an initial review of the interim report we confirm our agreement in principle with the package of measures and recommendations proposed by the IRP.
“These include the removal of opportunities and incentives for breaches in integrity, the establishment of a restructured, more independent Tennis Integrity Unit, enhanced education, expanded rules, and greater cooperation and collaboration with the betting industry and broader sports community.”