Fakieh Aquarium only one part of a bigger dream

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Updated 22 January 2013
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Fakieh Aquarium only one part of a bigger dream

JEDDAH: The long-awaited Jeddah corniche aquarium finally opened its doors to the public yesterday with Makkah Gov. Prince Khaled Al-Faisal handling the formalities. The project, developed by Fakieh Tourism Group, cost SR 250 million and has been under construction for six years.
Abdurrahman Fakieh, founder and chairman of the Fakieh Group, said the aquarium is only one part of a bigger dream that encompasses the transformation of Jeddah into a city full of educational entertainment possibilities. It could be thought of as serendipitous that the project was finally complete and opened just a month after north corniche was reopened to the public.
The aquarium as it now stands is only half of what was originally envisioned. According to Fakieh, a 100 meter tower dedicated to the study of outer space was originally planned as part of the project. Neighborhood opposition scuttled its inclusion in the aquarium project.
A source involved in the project told Arab News that construction work on the aquarium was stopped several times because of complaints from residents of the area, specifically about the tower. They claimed that the tower could potentially prove to be a threat to their privacy, allowing visitors to see onto their property.
The aquarium is home to more than 7,000 marine animals comprising 200 species in 155 tanks. It has a shark section, a dolphin show that can accommodate 400 visitors, sea lions, reef tanks, mangroves and interactive halls, in addition to laboratories for research and study.


Travel back in time at Jeddah’s cultural and heritage cafe

Cafe Magad is home to precious and rare historical antiques where tourists feel a strong sense of connection with historic Jeddah. AN photo
Updated 28 min 33 sec ago
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Travel back in time at Jeddah’s cultural and heritage cafe

  • The people of the historic area still hold their values and Ramadan traditions
  • Tourists can learn about the historical area over a cup of coffee

JEDDAH: Historic Jeddah is home to Cafe Magad, the cultural and heritage cafe. It holds many hidden treasures of the historical area. The owner and historical consultant Mazen Al-Saqaf explained how the cafe surfaced.

“It was created for visitors and tourists at the historical area of the city of Jeddah.
“Before we created the cafe, we looked at what visitors and tourists needed there, and we found that there was no restful place. Therefore we created a cafe that resembled the sitting rooms and salons in the old houses,” Al-Saqaf told Arab News.
Tourists can learn about the historical area over a cup of coffee, he said.
“It includes a small library that has books on historic Jeddah in Arabic, English and French, for tourists.”
It is also a popular destination among intellectuals and scholars. “Many historians, thinkers and literary scholars are quite fond of this cafe. They enjoy visiting it and writing about historic Jeddah,” Al-Saqaf said.
“I help historians who are writing about historic Jeddah. If anyone has a scientific paper on it, we assist them with rare photographs, rare documents, and rare books and sources,” he added.
“On the walls, you have old photographs of historic Jeddah. Visitors and tourists can see how the historic area was and how it is now. There are photographs of embassies: The American Embassy, the British Embassy, the French Embassy. When tourists visit, they can see their embassies. They used to be in these historic houses. There are also photographs of the Dutch Embassy and the Italian Embassy.
“And tourists feel some sort of connection between their history and historic Jeddah,” Al-Saqaf told Arab News.
The cafe is also home to precious and rare historical antiques.
“It holds rare antiques of historic Jeddah. For example, here we have a rare manuscript from the Mamluk period. It is from the year 800 H., and a telephone of King Farouk of Egypt, and a document of the first cheque in the Arabian Peninsula,” said Al-Saqaf.
“Every Saturday we hold a literary night, for historians, scholars and thinkers. We also have musical nights. We do all this to attract visitors from outside the historic area. We are contributing to enriching tourism,” Al-Saqaf told Arab News.
He explained that the cafe is relatively new, but the building is not: “The cafe is three years old, the building is over 400 years old.”
The people of the historic area still hold their values and Ramadan traditions.
“They gather here at the cultural and heritage cafe as one family. Each person brings a dish, and we experience Ramadan like the old days,” Al-Saqaf told Arab News.