Hanan Al-Faisal: Creative children designs

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Updated 30 January 2013
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Hanan Al-Faisal: Creative children designs

Saudi fashion designer Hanan Al-Faisal started her career as an artist. However, here limitless passion prodded her to seek greater dreams. The talented designer sought to express herself in art beyond the canvas, which is why she decided to pursue a career in fashion design. She credits the intricate details in her creations to her earlier calling as an artist, which she describes as the gateway to the world of fashion.
According to the designer, the reason she has been successful is because of her fearless nature and a boldness to experiment with new and avant-garde designs. She also attributes the obstacles she faced early on in her career as a great learning experience, which propelled her to adapt quickly and acquire new techniques.
Al-Faisal’s designs are very unique, as she usually stitches accessories to the dresses to give them an exclusive appeal. For nightgowns, the designer uses Swarovski crystals to give the dresses a more glamorous touch.
The designer keeps apace with the latest international trends by browsing the Internet and looks for inspirations by watching catwalks for the season’s latest styles and colors. She does not limit herself to international trends as she sees herself as a trendsetter and seeks inspiration from the rich culture present in her country.
Al-Faisal’s clients are the reasons behind her fearless style. Women in Saudi Arabia like to be unique and want to stand out in the crowd.
She also started an exclusive line especially for young girls, in an effort to help these girls discover their own style and create looks that suit their character.
Her summer collection offers girls a wide variety of dresses, with a mixture of colors inspired by the African landscape and gypsy culture, classical cuts as well as Romanian and Iranian elements.

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TheFace: Dr. Lama S. Taher, the successful fashion designer whose one dream was not enough

Dr. Lama S. Taher (AN photo by Ziyad Alarfaj)
Updated 20 April 2018
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TheFace: Dr. Lama S. Taher, the successful fashion designer whose one dream was not enough

  • Lacking in financial assistance but armed with grit, perseverance and passion, a young Saudi woman fashion designer launches her own brand while pursuing further studies, and succeed in both

I was born and raised in Riyadh and moved to London in 2004 to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree, followed by a Master’s degree in Mental Health.

Eight years ago, when I started on my Ph.D. in Psychology, I felt compelled to go into fashion design. Armed with grit, perseverance and passion, I took the plunge and launched my own brand, LUM, in May 2010.

I had no financial assistance and no fancy business plans — but I believed in it. No one else did, except my older sister who stood by me.

In spite of its humble beginning, the brand was well-received in the Kingdom and the Gulf region. But my father, a physician, was not convinced. I placed a bet with him, vowing to make substantial sales and revenue within one month. On July 1, 2013, I won that bet, making him my number one supporter.  In 2016, I achieved my academic dream, obtaining a Ph.D. in psychology at City University London.  

But it was not easy. Enduring sleepless nights and homesickness, I persevered to meet high academic demands. Meanwhile, the LUM business continued to flourish.

People asked why a successful fashion designer would pursue a doctorate in psychology. I was constantly asked to pick one — but my heart was in one and my mind was in another. 

Few believed I could achieve both. At times, I too doubted myself.

Today, I am an assistant professor at Dar Al Hekma University in Jeddah, supervising award-winning researchers. I am also a Saudi designer and manager of a successful fashion brand sold in the GCC, New York and Los Angeles.  I share my story to empower women to pursue their dreams, to believe in themselves, to fight for what they want.

People still ask: “Why both?” 

I reply, smiling: “Because one dream was not enough.”