Women victims in 45% of domestic violence cases

Updated 29 January 2015
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Women victims in 45% of domestic violence cases

Women were the victims in 45 percent of domestic violence cases filed with the Ministry of Justice over the past 15 months, sources said recently.
Over the past two months, there were 2,491 cases filed with the ministry. Of this, 12 percent of the women said that their parents refused to let them marry and 10.5 percent sought shelter and protection from their abusers, the source was quoted as saying in a local publication.
Nine percent complained of sexual harassment and being abused by drug-addicted perpetrators, while 7 percent said that their abusers took their salaries.
A total of 4.3 percent of the women said they were denied access to their children, while 1.4 percent said they were prevented from getting an education.
Sahar Al-Sharif, a woman in her twenties, claimed she was raised by her violent brothers after her parents passed away. “It was a typical violent male upbringing. I was always the target of their violent behavior,” Al-Sharif said.
Al-Sharif said that she had hoped to escape from her abusers when she got married, but her husband also turned out to be violent. He beat her so badly during her first pregnancy that she nearly lost her baby.
An official at the Social Protection Shelter in Makkah said violence against women is on the rise.
There were 30 to 40 cases a month in 2013, but this rose to more than 60 cases a month by the middle of 2014.
“Cases of violence vary from denying women their right to education to sexual harassment. Husbands, fathers and brothers are the offenders in these cases,” said the official. There was no difference in the number of cases during the holy month of Ramadan.
She said female students at high school and college are mostly the ones who file complaints at the shelter. “These students are more aware of the issue. They know they have rights and the law is on their side,” she said.
Kholoud Nasser, a social worker, said women must not accept abuse. “Parents sometimes abuse their daughters by forcing them to marry someone they don’t want to marry,” Nasser said.
She said some people think that violence is the way they should deal with others. “For them violence is the first and only way to communicate with women. It is therefore very important to apply the regulations and punish those involved in such abuse,” she said.


Hollywood star Cuba Gooding Jr. shares career at Saudi Film Festival

Updated 26 March 2019
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Hollywood star Cuba Gooding Jr. shares career at Saudi Film Festival

  • He said he hopes to support Saudi filmmakers through his recently launched production company
  • The festival, at Ithra, is part of the Sharqiah Season in the Eastern Province

DHAHRAN: Oscar-winning actor Cuba Gooding Jr. talked about his experiences in Hollywood, and the challenges he has faced during his career, when he appeared on Monday night at the fifth Saudi Film Festival, which is part of the Sharqiah Season in the Eastern Province.
Known for his roles in movies such as “Men of Honor”, “A Few Good Men” and “American Crime Story,” among others, he has appeared in more than 85 films during a 30-year career on screen and stage. He won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his performance in the 1996 film “Jerry Maguire,” alongside Tom Cruise and Renee Zellweger.
Gooding Jr. arrived for the event, at the King Abdul Aziz World Center for Culture (Ithra), accompanied by Claudine De Niro, the estranged wife of actor Robert De Niro’s son, Raphael. They were greeted by renowned Saudi film producer and Hollywood businessman Mohammed Al-Turki.
Gooding Jr. spoke to the audience at Ithra for almost 60 minutes about his long career and the challenges and pitfalls he had experienced on the road to success in the film industry. He also offered some advice to anyone interested in following in his footsteps.
“No one prepares you for success,” he said. “That’s why you see a lot of actors that star in movies, then disappear. Or you see athletes that make a $100 million and then they disappear, too. They weren’t ready for it.
“You have to envision yourself standing on that stage, holding an Oscar over your head, saying, ‘This is for the Middle-East’. You have to envision the script that you will write and envision being on that stage, holding that Oscar.
“People asked me after I won that Academy Award if I ever thought I would be on that stage. I always said, ‘Not in a million years.’ But that’s a lie. You have to envision yourself on that stage, winning that award, so that when you succeed it will feel normal, not like it’s something special, so that you can do it again.”
The actor also said that he intends to support filmmakers from Saudi Arabia and other countries through his recently launched production company.
Asked if he had any projects planned in the region, and Saudi Arabia in particular, he said: “I do, actually. I have a couple of things. I don’t want to give it away but let’s just say that there is a lot of great literature that I’ve read, a lot of different books, including Arabian Nights. It’s hard to talk about the things in development because you don’t want to give it away but there is definitely something in development.”