Arab leaders agree joint military force

1 / 2
2 / 2
Updated 30 March 2015
0

Arab leaders agree joint military force

SHARM EL SHEIKH: Arab leaders have agreed to form a joint military force after a summit dominated by a Saudi-led offensive on Houthis in Yemen and the threat from extremism. Arab representatives will meet over the next month to study the creation of the force and present their findings to defense ministers within four months, according to the resolution adopted by the leaders. “Assuming the great responsibility imposed by the great challenges facing our Arab nation and threatening its capabilities, the Arab leaders had decided to agree on the principle of a joint Arab military force,” Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sissi told the summit in the resort town of Sharm El-Sheikh. The decision was mostly aimed at fighting IS extremists who have overrun swathes of Iraq and Syria and secured a foothold in Libya, Arab League chief Nabil Al-Arabi said ahead of the summit. On Sunday, Al-Arabi told the meeting the region was threatened by a “destructive” force that threatened “ethnic and religious diversity,” in an apparent reference to the Islamic State group. “What is important is that today there is an important decision, in light of the tumult afflicting the Arab world,” he said. Egypt had pushed for the creation of the rapid response force to fight militants, and the matter gained urgency this week after Saudi Arabia and Arab allies launched air strikes on Houthi militants in Yemen. Al-Arabi, reading a statement at the conclusion of the summit, said on Sunday the offensive would continue until the Houthis withdraw from regions they have overrun and surrender their weapons. Several Arab states including Egypt are taking part in the military campaign, which Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman said would continue until the Yemeni people “enjoy security.”


Thousands of Iraqi families bear the burden of Daesh legacy

Updated 6 sec ago
0

Thousands of Iraqi families bear the burden of Daesh legacy

  • The wives, widows and children have been disowned by their relatives and abandoned by the state
  • Registrars refuse to register births to women with suspected Daesh husbands

MOSUL: Thousands of families in the Iraqi city of Mosul and elsewhere across the country face crushing discrimination because their male relatives were seen as affiliated with or supporting the Daesh group when the extremists held large swaths of Iraq.
The wives, widows and children have been disowned by their relatives and abandoned by the state.
Registrars refuse to register births to women with suspected Daesh husbands, and schools will not enroll their children because they are undocumented. Mothers are turned away from welfare, and mukhtars — community mayors — won’t let their families move into their neighborhoods.
Iraq has done little to probe the actions of the tens of thousands of men who willingly or by force joined, worked and possibly fought for Daesh during its brutal 2013-2017 rule.