Local partner condition may be scrapped to bolster FDI

Updated 07 February 2016
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Local partner condition may be scrapped to bolster FDI

JEDDAH: New steps being taken to increase the flow of foreign investments into Saudi Arabia this year have raised the expectations of the business community.
A triple sectorial committee, including Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA), Ministry of Commerce and Industry, and Ministry of Labor, is seriously reviewing factors that hinder investment in the Saudi market, Asharq Al-Awsat reported Saturday.
Quoting sources, the report said that the study is aimed to facilitate global companies’ investment in the Saudi market and to present them with incentives.
The daily also stated that the committee’s review would shift the current situation to a new standpoint, which eliminates all obstacles slowing down global investment.
The condition to have a local partner in a foreign investment project for it to be granted access to the Kingdom’s direct market has reduced the scale of foreign investment in Saudi Arabia.
The condition for the need for a local partner is likely to be removed when the committee concludes its studies, the report indicated.
James Reeve, deputy chief economist and assistant general manager, Samba Financial Group, said: “Saudi Arabia needs to attract FDI to help stem losses of international reserves.”
He told Arab News: “The main obstacle for foreign investors is the lack of clarity on bankruptcy laws. That, and the hiring and firing of nationals.”
Reeve said: “Retail is the main growth sector of the next few years. It is already in pretty good shape. One might expect some consolidation (i.e. fewer smaller independent outlets) and some bigger players.”
Said Al-Shaikh, group chief economist of the National Commercial Bank, commented: “Probably one of the things making it difficult for foreign investors is the issue of legal enforcement.”
The lengthy process of resolving commercial disputes is a major concern, he said. “Within the legal system there are until now no special courts for commercial disputes. They go to general courts.”
Al-Shaikh said: “The lengthy process in obtaining licenses is another hindrance.”
Fawaz Alfawaz, a Riyadh-based economic consultant, told Arab News: “It really depends on the type of investments we the Kingdom aspires to. The existing state of the economy makes energy intensive and distribution more attractive because of the cost structure in the Saudi economy. But as the Kingdom strives to modernize its economy the types of foreign investment we need becomes radically different.”
Alfawaz added: “SAGIA can help with streamlining the bureaucracy, the information, the rules and regulations but the heavy lifting is really on the total eco-system starting with public sector, private sector to find the right partners and the productivity of the Saudi labor market.”


‘Get prices down’ Trump tells OPEC

Updated 20 September 2018
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‘Get prices down’ Trump tells OPEC

  • Trump highlights US security role in region
  • Comments come ahead of oil producers meeting in Algeria

LONDON: US president Donald Trump urged OPEC to lower crude prices on Thursday while reminding Mideast oil exporters of US security support.
He made his remarks on Twitter ahead of a keenly awaited meeting of OPEC countries and its allies in Algiers this weekend as pressure mounts on them to prevent a spike in prices caused by the reimposition of oil sanctions on Iran.
“We protect the countries of the Middle East, they would not be safe for very long without us, and yet they continue to push for higher and higher oil prices!” he tweeted.
“We will remember. The OPEC monopoly must get prices down now!”
Despite the threat, the group and its allies are unlikely to agree to an official increase in output, Reuters reported on Thursday, citing OPEC sources.
In June they agreed to increase production by about one million barrels per day (bpd). That decision was was spurred by a recovery in oil prices, in part caused by OPEC and its partners agreeing to lower production since 2017.
Known as OPEC+, the group of oil producers which includes Russia are due to meet on Sunday in Algiers to look at how to allocate the additional one million bpd within its quote a framework.
OPEC sources told Reuters that there was no immediate plan for any official action as such a move would require OPEC to hold what it calls an extraordinary meeting, which is not on the table.
Oil prices slipped after Trumps remarks, with Brent crude shedding 40 cents to $79 a barrel in early afternoon trade in London while US light crude was unchanged at about $71.12.
Brent had been trading at around $80 on expectations that global supplies would come under pressure from the introduction of US sanctions on Iranian crude exports on Nov. 4.
Some countries has already started to halt imports from Tehran ahead of that deadline, leading analysts to speculate about how much spare capacity there is in the Middle East to compensate for the loss of Iranian exports as well as how much of that spare capacity can be easily brought online after years of under-investment in the industry.
Analysts expect oil to trend higher and through the $80 barrier as the deadline for US sanctions approaches.
“Brent is definitely fighting the $80 line, wanting to break above,” said SEB Markets chief commodities analyst Bjarne Schieldrop, Reuters reported. “But this is likely going to break very soon.”