Ferrari 458 Spider

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Updated 17 May 2012
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Ferrari 458 Spider

FERRARI’S exclusive new 8-cylinder, the 458 Spider has finally been unveiled to the public at the 64th Frankfurt International Motor Show.
The latest addition to the Ferrari range is a mid-rear-engined two-seater featuring a fully retractable aluminium hard-top, a world first for a sports car with this layout.
The 458 Spider’s innovative new hard-top is not only 25 kg lighter than a traditional folding soft-top, but is also quieter and thermally more efficient when raised. Aside from taking just 14 seconds to open or close, the hard-top was engineered to occupy a very small space when stored so that the designers were able to include a generous rear bench for luggage behind the two seats.
The rear windscreen doubles as an effective wind-stop which is electrically adjustable. When the hard-top is folded away the wind-stop opens to the height that guarantees the most efficient aerodynamics, reducing buffeting in the cockpit.
The 458 Spider is powered by Ferrari’s 570 CV 4,499 cc V8 which was named International Engine of the Year 2011. This is coupled with Ferrari’s class-leading dual-clutch F1 paddle-shift transmission which delivers 0 to 100 km/h acceleration in under 3.4 seconds and a maximum speed of 320 km/h.
The all-aluminum chassis incorporates new alloys and castings, also adopted on the coupé, which ensure the 458 Spider already conforms to 2020 safety legislation.
Its category-topping performance aside, the new car also boasts class-leading fuel consumption and emissions levels. Thanks to the HELE (High Emotion Low Emission) system, in fact, fuel consumption on the combined urban cycle stands at 11.8 l/100 km with CO2 emissions of 275 g/km.
Lining up alongside the 458 Spider is the entire Ferrari range, including the 458 Italia, the maximum expression of an extreme, high-performance driving experience. Today the V8 berlinetta is even more sporty.
New control software for the magnetorheological dampers improves body control, enhancing the feedback in sporty driving.


Prince heirs sue Illinois hospital over care during overdose

Updated 24 min 7 sec ago
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Prince heirs sue Illinois hospital over care during overdose

MINNEAPOLIS: Prince’s heirs have sued Walgreens and the Illinois hospital that treated the music superstar after he suffered from an opioid overdose, alleging that a doctor and various pharmacists failed to provide Prince with reasonable care, contributing to his death.
The wrongful-death lawsuit filed in Cook County, Illinois, alleges a doctor and pharmacist at Trinity Medical Center in Moline, Illinois, failed to appropriately treat and investigate Prince’s April 15, 2016, overdose, and that he died “as a direct and proximate cause of one or more ... deviations from the standards of care.”
It accuses Walgreen Co. and pharmacists at two of its Minnesota branches of “dispensing prescription medications not valid for a legitimate medical purpose.”
Walgreens and the hospital’s parent company both declined to comment Monday, citing pending litigation.
Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park studio compound in suburban Minneapolis on April 21, 2016. An autopsy found he died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times more powerful than heroin.
Authorities said it was likely Prince didn’t know he was taking the dangerous drug, which was laced in counterfeit pills made to look like a generic version of the painkiller Vicodin. The source of those pills is unknown and no one has been charged in Prince’s death.
A week before he died, Prince passed out on a flight home from an Atlanta concert and the private plane made an emergency stop in Moline. The musician had to be revived with two doses of a drug that reverses effects of an opioid overdose.
At Trinity Medical Center, Prince refused medical tests but was asked what drugs he took. Documents show a pill that he had with him, which was marked as Vicodin, was sent to the pharmacy for testing. A hospital pharmacist said it appeared to be Vicodin and returned it to Prince.
Prosecutors said last week that no chemical testing was done on the pill, but evidence suggests it was counterfeit and laced with fentanyl.
The lawsuit alleges the pharmacist and emergency room physician, Dr. Nicole Mancha, failed to timely diagnose and treat the overdose and failed to provide appropriate counseling.
The allegations against Walgreens stem from prescriptions that were dispensed to Prince, but written under the name of his bodyguard, Kirk Johnson. Authorities said Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg admitted that he prescribed oxycodone to Prince under Johnson’s name to protect Prince’s privacy. Schulenberg disputes that, but paid $30,000 to settle allegations the drug was prescribed illegally.
Attorneys for Prince’s family, George Loucas and John Goetz, said in a statement that they will have more to say when the time is right.
“Prince’s family wishes, through its investigation, to shed additional light on what happened to Prince. At the same time further light on the opiate epidemic will hopefully help the fight to save lives,” the attorneys said. “If Prince’s death helps save lives, then all was not lost.”