Fiji currency replaces Queen Elizabeth with animal kingdom

Updated 13 December 2012
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Fiji currency replaces Queen Elizabeth with animal kingdom

Fiji dropped the image of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II from a new range of bank notes and coins unveiled yesterday, replacing her with plants and animals native to the Pacific island state.
Fiji President Ratu Epeli Nailatikau said the new currency was a milestone for the former British colony, which became independent in 1970 and declared itself a republic in 1987 following a military coup. Nailatikau said the royal family had featured on Fiji’s currency since 1934 but it was time for the country to move on and introduce new coins and notes, which will enter circulation in January.
“With the new series comes a little sadness for many of us,” he said.
“We will witness a historical change. A change involving much feeling and sentiment and representing an emotional severance of a link to the British crown.
“But it is a change that is necessary. Our notes and coins will no longer feature the portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II — some will liken this to the dawning of a new era.” He said Fiji was “forever grateful” to the royal family for allowing it to use their likenesses on the currency, adding: “It is now time to move forward as we strive to create our own identity synonymous to what Fiji is all about.” Images on the polymer bank notes include the rare kulawai lorikeet, the beli fish and the tagimoucia flower, while the coins depict flying foxes, parrots and the banded iguana.
Reserve Bank governor Barry Whiteside said the new currency was more relevant to Fiji and would encourage pride in its environment.



“We’ve been a republic for 25 years, which means the queen has not been our head of state for 25 years,” he said.
“We’re just looking at the natural wonders around us and trying to reflect that in this issue.”


Boyband BTS make K-Pop history topping US album charts

Updated 28 May 2018
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Boyband BTS make K-Pop history topping US album charts

SEOUL: Korean boyband phenomenon BTS have become the first K-Pop group to rise to the top of the US album charts, a vivid illustration of the genre’s growing global appeal.
Known for boyish good looks, floppy haircuts and meticulously choreographed dance moves, the septet has become one of South Korea’s best known and most lucrative musical exports.
On Sunday, they passed a new milestone — becoming the first K-Pop group to top the Billboard 200 music charts which ranks albums via sales, downloads and streams.
“It’s the first No. 1 for the seven-member group, and the first K-pop album to lead the tally,” Billboard wrote in its online report detailing the latest chart ranking.
While plenty of older music listeners in the West might be asking “who?,” it’s hard to underestimate the popularity of BTS and their seven stars Suga, J-Hope, Rap Monster, Jimin, V, Jungkook and Jin.
According to one data analysis, they were they most talked about phenomenon on Twitter in 2017, with nearly double the number of mentions on the social media platform than US President Donald Trump and Canadian badboy heartthrob Justin Bieber combined.
Throw in their similarly massive appeal across the globe — they have huge social media followings in Japan, China, Southeast Asia and parts of Latin America — and you have a truly global supergroup.
Their new album “Love Yourself: Tear” toppled “Beerpong and Bentleys” by rising hip-hop star Post Malone, whose facial tattoos are the very antithesis of BTS’ wholesome, meticulously manicured image.
While BTS sing in Korean, their style successfully fuses the catchy earworms of K-Pop with hip-hop and R’n’B.
Last year, their previous release “Love Yourself: Her” became the first K-Pop album to make it into the top 10 US album charts, rising to number seven, and hit the number one spot on iTunes in more than 70 countries.