A band for fitness: The latest craze in health-conscious youth

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Updated 23 February 2013
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A band for fitness: The latest craze in health-conscious youth

A multifunctional wristband that tracks a user’s daily physical activity and the number of calories burnt has gained a large following among the Kingdom's youngsters.
Mohanned Mandourah, 25, a Jeddah-based senior account executive, is fond of his FuelBand because it measures his daily movement and helps him in keeping a tab on his calorie intake. “It keeps me motivated during the day to be more active,” said Mandourah, “Ever since I wore it, I stopped using elevators.”
He said he enjoys tracking his activity as the wristband lets the user collect points like in a game.
The FuelBand, a Nike+ product, measures any movement, from walking, running and dancing to basketball and other sports, and allows the user to set a daily goal, depending on how active they want to be.
The wristband can be connected to Nike’s website and their iOS smart phone application, in which the user can see the progress they made in a diagram.
The band’s LED display light from red to green. The red zone indicates the user has not yet achieved the activity goal for the day. The greener it gets, the more likely the user is to achieve their daily goal.
Once the wristband is connected to their smart phone, the user will get rewards for achieving goals. Thus, it will motivate the user to exercise more. A user can share achievements through social media like Facebook, Twitter and Path.
The wristband comes in three colors: white ice, black ice and black. It can be ordered online for $ 149 (SR 560) or from iWeaver branches for SR 800.
“When you put effort into being more active, you’ll automatically care about your calories and diet. For example, I consumed three teaspoons of sugar in my tea before, whereas now I either use sweetener or avoid sugar completely,” added Mandourah.
He’s happy now that he’s aware of his calorie intake as he says it encourages him to exercise more often. Zayed Sabri, 25, an engineer and a FuelBand-user, said it motivates him to watch his daily goal diagram at the end of the day. “One day I was not very active. So in order to accomplish my daily goal, I put on my track shoes, went outside and ran around the house.”
Sabri said he never thought he would be this enthusiastic when it came to exercising. “I even feel guilty now when I end up eating more than I should, calorie-wise.”
Mohammed Abunada, manager of iWeaver in Jeddah, said: “We had a lot of orders coming in ever since the wristband hit our stores. Even though it’s sold out now, people are still registering their names to reserve a couple of these wristbands.”


Saudi food app is perfect recipe for people in need

Updated 19 May 2018
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Saudi food app is perfect recipe for people in need

JEDDAH: A Saudi relationship manager has designed a mobile app that allows food to be delivered to people in need, including Syrian refugees living in camps in Lebanon and Turkey.
Western region manager Fahad bin Thabit, 34, described his YummCloud app as a “sharing economy” platform.
After working with app developers from India, Ukraine and the US, Thabit launched the platform in late April with help from the US digital agency Ingic.
YummCloud was featured in US company news, such as Cision PRWeb.
“The idea behind YummCloud was to provide home-cooked meals to the users in the most convenient way,” Cision PRWeb said.
“Developers were told to develop an open platform app that will let users buy, sell or send home-cooked meals around them. All a user has to do is to choose the food they would like to eat and get it delivered at their convenience.”
Thabit said that his brother, who lives in France, was the inadvertent inspiration behind the app.
“At that time I wanted to send him food and that was when I had the idea: Why can’t I send him local food?
“I could not find any of our local food there, and this was how the application came up. I said once I can do that, I can send food to anyone anywhere in the world — all I need to do is provide the supplier,” Thabit told Arab News.
Anyone can help communities in need via the application, he said.
Thabit said he was planning to help Syrian refugees in Turkey.
“We call these meals ‘humanitarian meals’ — all we need to do is reach them via a social network and get a supplier there. People who sympathize with the refugees — they could be 100 kilometers away or in different parts of the world — can pay online and buy meals for them.”
He said whole communities could take part in the “sharing economy.”
“For example, in Africa, there are areas that have people suffering from starvation, but there are other areas that have food supplies, so if you buy the supplies from those areas, they can import them to the starvation-stricken areas. This is what I call a sharing economy.”
The app’s international features are still under development, but are expected to launch in two years.
“We can create a market anywhere in the world. All we need to do is add a language, find a delivery company there, and if there isn’t one, people can deliver it themselves.
“We had 500 orders in the first 10 days of the launch in Saudi Arabia.”
Thabit said that transportation network company Careem was acting as a logistics partner.
“Careem have us covered everywhere — it is operating in Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, and Egypt. Wherever Careem is present, we are there regarding delivery,” he said.
Thabit said he had agreements with delivery companies and charities in different parts of the world for YummCloud’s global transition.
The application is an efficient humanitarian platform.
“We provide a platform for everyone to help everyone,” he said.