Ford a major player in digital revolution

Updated 23 January 2013
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Ford a major player in digital revolution

In Ford’s Silicon Valley Lab, Dave Evans creates a custom vehicle gauge and emails the 3D design to Zac Nelson in Dearborn. Nelson uses the MakerBot Thing-O-Matic at his workstation and prints up a physical prototype. The future of research and development is happening right here and now at the desks of these Ford engineers.
Just like laser printers today, expect 3D printers to be commonplace tomorrow. Engineers throughout the industry will have the ability to visualize a design on a computer screen and have the physical prototype show up at a colleague’s desk on the other side of the country in minutes. With this capability, the most qualified experts in each domain can make changes that feed into a tangible model. They can then share a 3D CAD design with the improvements.
“We’ve been shifting from the tangible world to the computer world, and the reality is that a hybrid model works best,” says K. Venkatesh Prasad, senior technical leader, open innovation, and a member of Ford’s Technology Advisory Board, Research and Innovation.
“There is nothing like having a tangible prototype, but it has always been time consuming and expensive to create. Now, at the press of a button, you can have the product or component at your fingertips," he adds. "With a model in one hand, you can then input your changes back into the computer model. The best decisions are made from the highest quality engineer and at the best pace.”
Currently thought of as a do-it-yourself tool for independent entrepreneurs and hobbyists, MakerBot enables users to design and produce products in various plastic materials.
Ford is using this low-cost 3D printing in similar ways to other technology companies, mainly for small developments like shift knobs, gauges and display modules.
Ford is using 3D printing in the manufacturing world, bridging the gap between abstract and practical. Large industrial rapid prototyping machines have made significant gains in the manufacturing world, and Ford is fully invested in the latest commercial 3D printing innovations.
Recently, many of the components for the 3.5-liter EcoBoost engine in the all-new Transit Van were developed with the aid of 3D rapid manufacturing. Cast aluminum oil filtration adaptors, exhaust manifolds, differential carrier, brake rotors, oil pan, differential case casting and even rear axles were prototyped with the technology, specifically utilizing selective laser sintering, stereolithography and 3D sand casting.
Additionally, Ford is a leader in a new variation on this technology: 3D printing with sand allows for the creation of casting patterns and cores with multiple printers in-house.


Celebrity cosmetic surgeon in Brazil vanishes after patient dies

Dr. Bumbum. (Courtesy: Facebook)
Updated 18 July 2018
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Celebrity cosmetic surgeon in Brazil vanishes after patient dies

  • She was suffering from a racing heart-beat and hypertension, and after four heart attacks she died
  • Brazil is second only to the United States for the number of plastic surgeries carried out

RIO DE JANEIRO: A Brazilian celebrity butt-enhancement surgeon called Dr. Bumbum has gone on the run following the death of a patient just hours after undergoing cosmetic surgery at his home in Rio de Janeiro.
Denis Furtado was considered capable of performing magic on women’s bodies, in particular their bottoms, and became known throughout the country for his expertise.
The 45-year-old’s Instagram account reflects his popularity with 650,000 followers.
But now he is wanted by police after Lilian Quezia Calixto died just hours after a butt enlargement procedure at his home in the swanky Barra de Tijuca neighborhood.
Calixto had traveled 2,000 kilometers (1,250 miles) from her home in Cuiaba to see the surgeon to the stars.
But following the controversial injection of acrylic glass filler, Calixto started feeling ill.
Upon arriving at hospital on Sunday, she was suffering from a racing heart-beat and hypertension, and after four heart attacks she died.
Soon after, Furtado disappeared and is now wanted for homicide and criminal association, while his girlfriend, who some media claim was also his assistant, has been detained.
The news has caused shock waves throughout the industry — Brazil is second only to the United States for the number of plastic surgeries carried out.
The Brazilian Plastic Surgery Society (SBPC) was quick to denounce Furtado, saying “the growing invasion of non-specialists in the specialty has provoked more and more fatalities like this one.”
“You cannot perform plastic surgery inside an apartment. Many people are selling a dream, a fantasy to patients in an unethical way and people, weakened, are often attracted to low prices, without considering whether or not the conditions are adequate,” SBPC president Niveo Steffen told AFP.
Steffen said the injection of synthetic biopolymers or polymers, like acrylic glass, is very dangerous and has caused dozens of deaths among women in Latin America, especially in Venezuela.
He said Furtado’s case demonstrates the “trivialization of cosmetic procedures by unspecialized professionals, who often aren’t doctors and are putting people at risk.”
According to the G1 Internet site, Furtado has been charged by police four times for illegally practicing medicine and crimes against consumers.