Founder of Morocco Islamist party dies

Updated 13 December 2012
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Founder of Morocco Islamist party dies

RABAT: Abdessalam Yassine, leader of Morocco's Justice and Charity Islamist movement, died on Thursday aged 84, the banned but tolerated group's spokesman told AFP.
The founder of the movement, known as Adl wal Ihsan in Arabic, died at around 0730 GMT, Fathallah Arsalane said.
His funeral is due to be held during weekly Muslim prayers on Friday at the Sunna mosque in central Rabat, with a large crowd likely to attend.
As founder of Morocco's most popular Islamist movement, Sheikh Yassine had running problems with the authorities during the so-called Years of Lead under the late king Hassan II, when he was imprisoned twice and placed under house arrest.
The movement he created in 1973 advocated establishment of an Islamist state. It actively participated in Arab Spring protests that erupted in Morocco in February 2011.
But it distanced itself from the February 20 protest movement in December last year, considering its demands too limited.


Houthi militias use children to plant mines in liberated areas: minister

Updated 9 min 49 sec ago
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Houthi militias use children to plant mines in liberated areas: minister

  • Yemen’s minister of human rights revealed that Houthi militias backed by Iran are using children to plant mines in areas that they are being expelled from.
  • Askar explained that Houthi militias used different types of mines, including anti-personnel mines which are banned in residential areas and are very dangerous, and camouflaged and improvised mines.

LONDON: Yemen’s minister of human rights Dr. Mohammed Askar revealed that Houthi militias backed by Iran are using children to plant mines in areas that they are being expelled from. He also said that they are planting bombs in houses, hospitals, and places of worship, threatening civilians.
Askar explained that Houthi militias used different types of mines, including anti-personnel mines which are banned in residential areas and are very dangerous, and camouflaged and improvised mines.
The Houthi militias have also invented new ways of using anti-vehicle mines and transforming them so that they can be used as anti-personnel mines with the intention of killing and injuring as many people as possible.
He added that Houthi militias have exploited the difficult economic and social conditions and the complex tribal nature of Yemen to attract and recruit children.
Many families send their children to join the Houthis in exchange for 50,000 Yemeni riyals ($150) in order to fulfil their daily needs, especially in large families.
Houthis are also carrying out campaigns to religiously mobilize children in Saudi where students are given weekly lessons on the benefits of war.