Global forum in Riyadh to bring together top educationists, investors

Updated 27 January 2013
0

Global forum in Riyadh to bring together top educationists, investors

JEDDAH: More than 200 international companies will take part in the Feb. 18-22 International Exhibition and Forum for Education (IEFE 2013) in Riyadh that brings together key decision makers and investors.
“The event will provide substantial opportunities for international businesses in the education sector to create partnerships and connect with decision makers from Saudi and GCC government bodies overseeing educational development,” said Deputy Education Minister Naif bin Hashal Al-Roumi.
“It is the biggest and most well attended annual educational exhibition and conference in the Gulf region with over 40,000 visitors turning up at the 2012 event,” said Al-Roumi, general supervisor of the event.
He said 34 research papers would be presented at the conference by experts from Saudi Arabia, US, UK, Finland, Switzerland, Lebanon, Singapore, Cyprus, Spain, Jordan, Belgium, France and New Zealand.
“IEFE 2013 will attract senior decision makers, key industry education providers and stakeholders from around the world for a great, inspiring networking and learning experience,” Al-Roumi said. Apart from inspiring keynote presentations by international experts, the forum provides an opportunity for one-to-one meeting to foster cooperation, potential collaboration and possible commercial agreements. “This is an excellent platform for generating alliances,” Al-Roumi said. IEFE 2013’s main theme will be Educational Evaluation Approach & Techniques. This is in line with the key objective of improving and implementing cutting edge evaluation techniques for the performance of schools and higher learning institutions in the Kingdom and the GCC region.
The focus of the five-day conference will be on achieving promoting excellence, quality, performance improvement, deploying innovative solutions, new investment and international partnerships to achieve the desired objectives.
Al-Roumi said the workshops to be held during the conference would focus on best global practices in teacher training and how to make use of modern technology to improve the performance of students.


Saudi MERS outbreaks killed 23 over four months: WHO

Updated 1 min 35 sec ago
0

Saudi MERS outbreaks killed 23 over four months: WHO

  • The latest figures take the number of confirmed cases to 2,220 since September 2012, including 1,844 from Saudi Arabia
  • The disease is hard to spot, partly because it often infects people with an underlying condition such as diabetes, renal failure or chronic lung disease

GENEVA: Outbreaks of the deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) killed 23 people in Saudi Arabia between Jan. 21 and May 31 this year, the World Health Organization said on Monday.
The deaths were among 75 laboratory-confirmed cases of MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) during the period, the WHO said, and take the total number of deaths from the disease to 790 since it was first diagnosed in humans in 2012.
The latest figures take the number of confirmed cases to 2,220 since September 2012, including 1,844 from Saudi Arabia.
One outbreak in February hit a private hospital in Hafer Albatin region, where the patient passed the disease to three health workers. There was another cluster of six cases in a hospital in Riyadh in the same month, although no health care workers were infected.
Two other clusters affected households in Jeddah and Najran.
MERS-CoV is a member of a virus family ranging from the common cold to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. It appears to have emerged in humans in Saudi Arabia in 2012, although it has been traced in camels, the source of the infection, back to at least 1983.
The disease is hard to spot, partly because it often infects people with an underlying condition such as diabetes, renal failure or chronic lung disease.
But it kills one in three sufferers, and hospital workers are at risk unless extreme caution is taken to identify MERS sufferers early and to protect health care workers from infection via airborne droplets such as from coughs and sneezes.
Susceptible people should avoid contact with suspected cases and with camels, and anyone who has contact with animals should wash their hands before and afterwards, the WHO said. Everyone should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating undercooked meat.
Three MERS cases have been reported this year outside Saudi Arabia. Oman and the United Arab Emirates each reported a case, while in Malaysia a man fell ill after drinking unpasteurised camel milk during a pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia.