Google helps Delhi’s iconic Chandni Chowk market go online

Updated 16 December 2012
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Google helps Delhi’s iconic Chandni Chowk market go online

NEW DELHI: Over 2,500 businesses in the capital’s iconic Chandni Chowk market are now online with their own websites as part of an initiative by Google, owner of the world’s most popular search engine. Google, as part of its ‘India Get Your Business Online’ initiative launched in November 2011, offers free websites and domains to small and medium businesses (SMBs) in the country.
“With over 137 million Internet users in the country, an increasing number of users are now looking for local information online,” Google India VP and Managing Director (Sales and Operations) Rajan Anandan said at an event. Over 2,500 businesses in Chandni Chowk market are now online as part of an initiative by Google.
An initiative like this helps SMBs get started on the Internet, he added. “There are 47 million SMBs in the country, but only 4,00,000 have a web presence. Of this, only 1,00,000 have a decent quality web presence,” Anandan said. As part of the project, Google India and HostGator went to each shop in Chandni Chowk and built over 2,500 free websites for businesses operating from the market.
In addition to creating these websites, Google India has also launched a common website www.chandnichowknowonline.in to provide a directory of businesses from Chandni Chowk. Chandni Chowk is a hub of small and medium businesses in north India with over 5,000 businesses including suppliers, exporters and wholesalers, but very few own a website.


Ancient skeleton of child found in ruins of Pompeii's bath

Updated 25 April 2018
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Ancient skeleton of child found in ruins of Pompeii's bath

ROME (AP) — Work at ancient thermal baths in Pompeii's ruins has revealed the skeleton of a crouching child who perished in Mount Vesuvius' eruption in AD 79.
Pompeii's director Massimo Osanna said in a statement Wednesday that the skeleton, believed to be of a 7- or 8-year-old child, was found during work in February to shore up the main ancient baths in the sprawling archaeological site. The skeleton was removed on Tuesday from the baths' area for study, including DNA testing to determine the sex.
Osanna said it appears the skeleton might have been first spotted during a 19th-century excavation of the area, since the leg bones were orderly placed near the pelvis, but, for reasons unclear, wasn't removed by those earlier archaeologists.
Experts think deadly volcanic gases killed the child.