Halal meat is Australia’s greatest export

Updated 26 January 2013
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Halal meat is Australia’s greatest export

Australia may be famous for many things — its movie stars such as Hugh Jackman, Nicole Kidman and pop icon Kylie Minogue but its greatest export is a culinary one — the quality of its delicious halal meat.
With around 16 percent of Australia’s beef exports to the Middle East and North African region destined to the Kingdom and a surge in demand for high-quality grain-fed beef and wagyu, it seems Saudi Arabia does not get enough of this premium product.
The Kingdom is also the largest destination for Australian mutton in the region, accounting for 27 percent of shipments.
Tarek Ibrahim, celebrity chef and star of Fatafeat TV, says: “As one of the world’s greatest food-producing nations, Australia deserves and enjoys a reputation for excellence so it comes as no surprise that Australia produces some of the world’s greatest meat.”
Tarek Ibrahim adds: “When talking about meat, for me it has to be Australian. It’s the only country in the world where I truly trust the halal and food safety systems. It’s utterly delicious and a dream to cook with for anyone from a top executive chef to the home cook.”
Ibrahim said: “Australians are renowned for their ‘barbies’ and what better way to celebrate Australia Day than to relax with family and friends over a delicious barbecue. Surf between flavors and textures; for example, if you like steak that has a light and gentle flavor choose grain-fed beef and for a deeper flavor go for the grass-fed selection.”
He added: “The hand test can give you a good sense of how hot the grill or barbecue plate is. Hold your outstretched palm about 6cm from the heat. If you can only hold it above the heat for around a second it means it’s too hot. If you can hold your hand above the heat for three-four seconds it’s at a moderately high temperature, which is perfect for barbecuing. Any longer, say eight seconds, then the heat is too low. The barbecue should be hot enough to sizzle the meat as it makes contact with the plate or grill.”


Abraaj gets $50 mln Abu Dhabi bid for investment management business

Updated 4 min 8 sec ago
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Abraaj gets $50 mln Abu Dhabi bid for investment management business

ABU DHABI: An Abu Dhabi Financial Group company has made a conditional $50 million offer to buy private equity firm Abraaj's investment management business, a document reviewed by Reuters shows.
Abu Dhabi Capital Management's (ADCM) bid is well below the $125 million offered by New York-based Cerberus Capital Management before Dubai-based Abraaj filed for provisional liquidation in the Cayman Islands last week.
It was unclear whether the terms of the offer that Cerberus made were different from the one made by ADCM.
ADCM stated its terms in a letter to Abraaj's financial adviser Houlihan Lokey dated June 17, which said it will not buy any companies owned by Abraaj and its affiliates and will not assuume any liabilities.
Abraaj has been bruised by a row with four of its investors, including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and International Finance Corp (IFC), in a $1 billion healthcare fund.
It has denied it misused the funds.
Abraaj Holdings said on Tuesday a court in the Cayman Islands ordered the appointment of PwC as provisional liquidators of Abraaj Holdings and Deloitte as provisional liquidators of Abraaj Investment Management Ltd., Abraaj's fund management business.
ADCM, an ADFG entity based in Cayman Islands, wants to become the General Partner of the limited partnerships, which have committed money to Abraaj's various private equity funds.
Abraaj acts as the general partner for these limited partnerships.
Some Gulf limited partners - ranging from financial institutions to pension funds and family businesses - in funds of Abraaj had asked ADFG to explore a buyout of Abraaj's investments business as they were concerned about their holdings, two sources familiar with the talks told Reuters.
Abraaj, which declined to comment on ADCM's offer, has debt estimated at more than $1 billion, sources have told Reuters.
Since the dispute went public early this year, Abraaj has split its investment management business and holding company, while its founder Arif Naqvi stepped aside from the day-to-day running of its private equity fund unit and the firm halted its investment activities.