Have America’s generals lost their way?



Dan De Luce | AFP

Published — Wednesday 14 November 2012

Last update 14 November 2012 6:59 am

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THE sex scandal that punctured the image of America’s most admired general, David Petraeus, is just the latest in a litany of cases of misconduct plaguing the US top brass, raising questions about a military often isolated from the rest of civilian society.
Even before Petraeus — a retired four-star commander — stunned Washington by announcing his resignation from the CIA over an extramarital affair, a growing number of generals and other senior officers were facing allegations of ethical lapses as well as sexual abuse.
The revelations paint a picture of military leadership living a privileged, insulated existence, in a country that often discourages public criticism of anyone in uniform, after a decade of wars waged by an all-volunteer force.
The cloud forming over senior officers stems from recent cases that include the former head of Africa Command, Gen. William Ward, who spent government funds to live a lavish lifestyle and ordered staff to perform personal errands, an inspector general’s report found.
An Army brigadier general, Jeffrey Sinclair, the deputy commander of the 82nd Airborne Division, was removed from his post earlier this year in Afghanistan after being accused of sexual misconduct with subordinates and of threatening one woman’s life.
According to prosecutors, when questioned about his demeaning comments about women, Sinclair replied: “I’m a general, I’ll do whatever the (expletive) I want.”
His alleged remark reflects what critics call a culture of entitlement among top officers, who they contend are held to a different standard than rank-and-file soldiers.
Another inspector general report found Lt. Gen. Patrick O’Reilly heaped abuse on his underlings at the Missile Defense Agency (MDA). One witness cited in the report described the general’s leadership style as “management by blowtorch and pliers.”
Although the army has come in for the most scrutiny, no service has been immune.
The air force has struggled to cope with a flood of allegations of sexual assault against female recruits at its basic training center in Lackland, Texas, and the Navy took the unusual step last month of relieving Rear Admiral Charles Gaouette of his command of the Stennis aircraft carrier group while it was on mission in the Arabian Sea.
The scandals of misconduct gained renewed attention after the most prominent officer of his generation, Petraeus, abruptly stepped down as CIA chief last week. No general was as revered and prominent as Petraeus, the soldier-scholar who was credited with rescuing the war effort in Iraq.
His successor in Afghanistan, Gen. John Allen, now finds himself embroiled in the scandal, with the Pentagon inspector general launching an investigation into potentially “inappropriate” emails between Allen and a key figure in the case, Jill Kelley.

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