Health official assures coronavirus is non-transmissible between humans

Updated 07 November 2012
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Health official assures coronavirus is non-transmissible between humans

RIYADH:A senior official from the Ministry of Health (MOH) stated on Monday that there is no cause for alarm regarding the detection of a coronavirus case in Riyadh, early this week. 
Undersecretary to the Ministry of Health for Public Health Dr. Ziad Al-Memish told a news conference in Riyadh on Monday that people do not need to worry about the outbreak of coronavirus. He further added that the virus is not transmissible from one person to the other. However, people need to be made aware of the presence of the virus, to take preventive measures to safeguard themselves and their families. 
On Sunday, the MOH announced that it diagnosed a resident in Riyadh as a positive carrier of coronavirus. The tests were confirmed when the sample from the patient was sent to a reputable overseas laboratory. 
A team of specialists in relevant fields also took part in the press conference. 
Speaking to the press, Al-Memish said that upon detecting the virus, the MOH took all preventive measures to contain the virus. “The patient is being treated according to the scientific measures spelt out by the World Health Organization (WHO), and has shown positive indications of recovery. 
“We are also monitoring the virus in all parts of the Kingdom through the regional directorates of the MOH,” he added. 
Al-Memish, who is also the chairman of the National Scientific Committee for Infectious Diseases, said that only a few people in the world have been diagnosed with the virus. 
He further added that the Kingdom has coordinated with international health bodies, including the WHO, to stay up to date with the latest developments concerning coronavirus and other viruses. He also pointed out, that the ministry set up a national committee, comprising specialized consultants representing health sectors in all relevant fields.  
At the beginning of Haj season, coronavirus was detected within two patients in the Kingdom. 
Coronaviruses are considered to be one of the common etiological agents of the common cold. Symptoms of the virus include a runny nose, mild sore throat, cough, headache, low fever and chills. The virus can also cause respiratory, intestinal and neurological ailments. Officials advise people to contact their doctors if the symptoms persist for more than two days.
The official also reassured that coronaviruses are treatable and most patients recover completely without enduring any further complications after receiving the needed supportive therapy. 
Al-Memish said that the Kingdom’s health officials are well equipped and experienced in dealing with infectious diseases. He further stressed the importance of early detection to ensure a quick recovery. He pointed out that 95 percent of the patients recover fast without any problems. 
Dr. Ali Bin Mansour Al-Barrak, member of the National Scientific Committee for Infectious Diseases, stated that the MOH has circulated a memo outlining the signs and symptoms of the disease, to all the hospitals in the Kingdom. 
Sami Ben Hussein Hajar, a consultant at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, added that so far the virus has not afflicted any children in the Kingdom. 
The virus can be fatal, especially among the elderly and in patients with chronic respiratory and cardiac conditions, as well as immunity compromised patients. 


TheFace: For this successful fashion designer, one dream was not enough

Updated 10 min 48 sec ago
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TheFace: For this successful fashion designer, one dream was not enough

  • Lacking in financial assistance but armed with grit, perseverance and passion, a young Saudi woman fashion designer launches her own brand while pursuing further studies, and succeed in both

I was born and raised in Riyadh and moved to London in 2004 to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree, followed by a Master’s degree in Mental Health.

Eight years ago, when I started on my Ph.D. in Psychology, I felt compelled to go into fashion design. Armed with grit, perseverance and passion, I took the plunge and launched my own brand, LUM, in May 2010.

I had no financial assistance and no fancy business plans — but I believed in it. No one else did, except my older sister who stood by me.

In spite of its humble beginning, the brand was well-received in the Kingdom and the Gulf region. But my father, a physician, was not convinced. I placed a bet with him, vowing to make substantial sales and revenue within one month. On July 1, 2013, I won that bet, making him my number one supporter.  In 2016, I achieved my academic dream, obtaining a Ph.D. in psychology at City University London.  

But it was not easy. Enduring sleepless nights and homesickness, I persevered to meet high academic demands. Meanwhile, the LUM business continued to flourish.

People asked why a successful fashion designer would pursue a doctorate in psychology. I was constantly asked to pick one — but my heart was in one and my mind was in another. 

Few believed I could achieve both. At times, I too doubted myself.

Today, I am an assistant professor at Dar Al Hekma University in Jeddah, supervising award-winning researchers. I am also a Saudi designer and manager of a successful fashion brand sold in the GCC, New York and Los Angeles.  I share my story to empower women to pursue their dreams, to believe in themselves, to fight for what they want.

People still ask: “Why both?” 

I reply, smiling: “Because one dream was not enough.”