IDB to develop community network

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Updated 06 November 2012
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IDB to develop community network

JEDDAH: The Islamic Development Bank (IDB) is hosting a three-day community development workshop for Muslim NGOs to accelerate social and economic development of member countries and Muslim communities in nonmember countries.
Essam Noor Fadel Al-Shanqiti, manager of Special Assistance Department at IDB, spoke at the opening session and said the workshop would help NGOs exchange ideas and experiences and share knowledge. “Muslim communities around the world have been benefiting from the bank’s special assistance program that enables them to carry out educational, social and health projects,” he said.
Malik Shah bin Mohd Yusoff, head of the scholarship program, highlighted his department’s achievements, saying the scholarship program was instrumental in producing a large number of qualified professionals. He urged IDB scholars to play an important role in the development of their communities.
Yusoff said: “IDB signed agreements with reputable international universities like Cambridge to help its scholarship students receive the best education in the world.” IDB has spent more than $ 95 million on its scholarship program, he added.
The IDB-Cambridge International Scholarship Program was launched within the scope of the IDB Merit Scholarship Program for Science and Technology to place students from member countries and Muslim communities in nonmember countries, in a three-year doctoral study at the university.
Mamoon Al-Azami, community development specialist and organizer of the event, said the workshop has three main goals: to create a global community development network, improve the performance of Muslim NGOs and achieve community and leadership development.
“We have been holding this workshop for the last 13 years,” he told Arab News, adding that 600 community leaders from 40 countries have benefited from the program.
The Muslim women’s NGO from Nigeria highlighted their innovative program to empower women by providing them education, training and employment. Rahma Moosa Sani of “Women in Dawa” said her organization has conducted a variety of programs to meet the needs of communities around her country. “We have trained 5,000 women this year alone,” she said, adding her organization is also instrumental in strengthening Muslim unity.
Ramla, a conference participant from the Philippines, raised the issue of unemployment among graduates of Qur’anic schools. The participants, including education specialists, emphasized the need to provide generation education to Qur’an memorization school students to enable them to find jobs.
Kassim Haji Hussein from Somalia told Arab News he was an IDB scholarship student and he established a private university “Jazeerah” in Mogadishu with the support of investors. “We would like to apply for IDB financial support to construct a new campus and a hospital,” he said.
Since its establishment in 1980, IDB’s special assistance division spent $ 723.8 million on 1,437 operations. They include 512 relief operations worth $ 441.9 million in member countries and 925 projects worth $ 281.9 million in nonmember countries.


Disappointed fans hail improved performance by Saudi Green Falcons but defeat ends World Cup dream

Updated 21 June 2018
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Disappointed fans hail improved performance by Saudi Green Falcons but defeat ends World Cup dream

  • A fan named Yousif, who watched the match at the General Sports Authority viewing tent, was happy that the game at least was close this time.
  • Saudi Arabia will face off against Egypt, who also lost their opening two group A games against Uruguay and Russia, on June 25.

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s World Cup dreams were shattered after Uruguay beat the Green Falcons 1-0 in the second of the three group-stage matches. Most Saudi fans in Jeddah were much happier with the team’s performance in game two, following the resounding 5-0 defeat by host nation Russia in the opening match on June 14, but still bitterly disappointed by the loss, which means they cannot qualify for the knockout stages.

Yousif, who watched the match at the General Sports Authority viewing tent, was happy that the game at least was close this time. “Although we lost, the performance was much better than the first game with Russia. I hope we win our next match,” he said.

Nasrah, who watched the game with her two sons, said: “I was really disappointed because we played good today and nothing less than a win should have been acceptable. I am also disappointed to see the looks on my boys faces when the game ended as they were hoping for a win.”

Khalid Al-Raghbi said at least it had been a good match to watch. “We played a bit better today,” he added. “I wish we would have won but at least we performed better than our last match against Russia.”

Before the game, Ibrahim Al-Turki had been optimistic about Saudi Arabia’s chances. “We didn’t expect today’s result. I was thinking that Saudi would win by two goals, and Uruguay would score one,” he said.

The result was especially disappointing given the close result and the number of chances the Saudis had to score, said Badr, who added: “I don’t know what to tell you because we are deeply disappointed. At least if we lost with a big defeat I would say we deserved it. We had the potential but we could not score.”

Shadi Al-Ghamdi said he wished the national team’s much improved performance in their second game had been more evident in their first. “I am very proud of the players, I thought they played very well. I just wish they had played like this against Russia," he said.

Safah was less complimentary and said that the Saudi players had let their fans down, adding: “They seemed scared whenever they attempted to score any goals.”

Saudi Arabia will face off against Egypt, who also lost their opening two group A games against Uruguay and Russia, on June 25. It will be the final game in the competition for both sides, with only pride to play for, as they battle it out to see who will finish third in the group and who will be left in bottom spot.